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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Threat hunters at Kaspersky find a malicious campaign that abuses Windows event logs to store fileless last stage Trojans and keep them hidden in the file system. [Read More]
Google's Threat Analysis Group (TAG) observed an increased number of threat actors using cyberattack themes related to the war in Ukraine. [Read More]
Hubble Technology banks $9 million in venture capital funding to build an “agentless technology asset visibility” aimed at disrupting the asset management space. [Read More]
The China-aligned threat actor was observed employing a trial-and-error approach to abusing traditional antivirus applications for DLL sideloading. [Read More]
Mandiant warns that a new threat actor is using backdoors to remain undetected for "an order of magnitude longer than the average dwell time of 21 days in 2021." [Read More]
Traceable AI, a startup building technology to reduce attack surfaces in APIs, has banked a new $60 million funding round that values the company at $450 million. [Read More]
Russian government-backed APT29 was observed using new malware families in attacks targeting diplomatic organizations in Europe, the Americas, and Asia. [Read More]
A dozen companies have been targeted by the new Black Basta ransomware and researchers say there may be some links to Conti. [Read More]
Initially observed in attacks in March 2022, the downloader has been used to drop payloads such as Cobalt Strike and Meterpreter, among others. [Read More]
Endpoint visibility technology vendor Fleet attracted $20 million in new funding at a valuation in the range of $100 million. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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Torsten George's picture
Ransomware is just one of many tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs) that threat actors are using to attack organizations by compromising remote user devices.
John Maddison's picture
Intent-based segmentation, deception technology, and an integrated security fabric are essential tools in beating malware designed to avoid detection and analysis.
Justin Fier's picture
The origin story of Mimikatz — a post-exploitation module that has enabled criminals to steal millions of passwords around the world — reads like an over-the-top spy thriller.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.