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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Microsoft has linked the recently patched MSHTML vulnerability (CVE-2021-40444) exploited via malicious Office documents to known ransomware operators. [Read More]
Linux and Windows variants of the payload carry remote access capabilities such as file manipulation and shell command execution. [Read More]
The patch comes exactly one week after the Redmond, Wash. software giant acknowledged the CVE-2021-40444 security defect and confirmed the existence of in-the-wild exploitation via booby-trapped Microsoft Office documents. [Read More]
Google joins Apple and Microsoft in warning about zero-day flaws being exploited in the wild. This time the target is the popular Google Chrome browser. [Read More]
Apple ships fixes for a pair of iOS and macOS security defects alongside a warning that these issues belong in the “actively exploited” zero-day category. [Read More]
Hackers leaked online credentials stolen from 87,000 VPN devices, affecting roughly 22,500 victims worldwide, including nearly 3,000 in the United States. [Read More]
Tenable makes its priciest acquisition to date and expands its product portfolio with capabilities to detect security problems in code before they become operational security risks. [Read More]
Cisco warns that these vulnerabilities could be exploited by attackers to reboot devices, elevate privileges, or overwrite and read arbitrary files. [Read More]
A critical security flaw in HAProxy could lead to HTTP request smuggling attacks, allowing attackers to bypass security controls and access sensitive data without authorization. [Read More]
GitHub has published documentation on seven vulnerabilities in the Node.js packages and warned that exploitation could expose users to code execution attacks. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The truth is that quite a lot of malware is developed by an organization—an actual office of people that show up and spend their working day writing malware for a paycheck.
Erin O’Malley's picture
When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
History shows that, in security, the next big thing isn’t always an entirely new thing. We have precedents—macro malware existed for decades before it really became a “thing.”
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
The FUD crypter service industry is giving a second life to a lot of old and kind-of-old malware, which can be pulled off the shelf by just about anybody with confused ethics and a Bitcoin account.
John Maddison's picture
Cryptojacking malware grew from impacting 13% of all organizations in Q4 of 2017 to 28% of companies in Q1 of 2018, more than doubling its footprint.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
A study found that over 98 percent of malware making it to the sandbox array uses at least one evasive tactic, and 32 percent of malware samples making it to this stage could be classified as “hyper-evasive".
Justin Fier's picture
The cost of electricity has led some to take shortcuts in the search for power sources - individuals and organizations are now being breached by cyber-criminals seeking to take advantage of corporate infrastructures.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
Historical patterns and recent activity indicate that another major Necurs malware outbreak is looming just around the corner.
Siggi Stefnisson's picture
It remains to be seen whether more legitimate web operations will embrace the approach, but you can count on illegitimate and malicious use of cryptomining to grow robustly.
David Holmes's picture
Take a step back and realize that cryptocurrency mining is really just another form of malware, which is something you should be good at finding already.