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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

CYBERCOM shares details and malware attributed to the Iran-linked threat actor MuddyWater. [Read More]
Dozens of journalists and human rights defenders in El Salvador had their cellphones repeatedly hacked with sophisticated spyware over the past year and a half. [Read More]
CISA, FBI and NSA have released a joint cybersecurity advisory providing an overview of cyber operations linked to the Russian government. [Read More]
The Albanian government said that it would hire a U.S. company to bolster its cybersecurity following a large leak last month. [Read More]
Microsoft’s first batch of patches for 2022 cover at least 97 security flaws, including a critical HTTP Protocol Stack bug described as “wormable.” [Read More]
Celebrated cryptographer Moxie Marlinspike is stepping down as chief executive at Signal, the encrypted messaging app he created more than a decade ago. [Read More]
The non-profit group says companies that ship open-source code should do much more to help with security audits and fixes. [Read More]
The U.S. government has issued a warning over the use of commercial surveillance tools and it has shared some recommendations. [Read More]
Patchwork APT targets molecular medicine and biology scientists with a new version of the BADNEWS RAT. [Read More]
Researchers document a credential -stealing banking malware campaign exploiting Microsoft's digital signature verification. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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Idan Aharoni's picture
Plausible deniability provides a massive operational leeway to military operations in cyberspace, enabling governments to take actions without risking an all-out war.
Gunter Ollmann's picture
While global corporations have been targeted by Iran-linked threat actors, the escalating tensions in recent weeks will inevitably bring more repercussions as tools and tactics change with new strategic goals.
Justin Fier's picture
Against the ongoing backdrop of cyber conflict between nation states and escalating warnings from the Department of Homeland Security, critical infrastructure is becoming a central target for threat actors.
Galina Antova's picture
We must recognize industrial cyberattacks as tactics in a new form of “economic warfare” being waged between nation-states to gain economic and political advantage without having to pay the price of open combat.
Oliver Rochford's picture
The lifting of certain sanctions may provide an alternative incentive to limit certain types of cyberwar activity.
Josh Lefkowitz's picture
It’s critical to recognize that there will always be virtual ways in which terrorists and other criminals can create threats that no border process or physical security program can stop.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Thomas Rid, Professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, joins the podcast to discuss the lack of nuance in the crypto debate and the future of global cyber conflict.
James McFarlin's picture
If there were any lingering doubts that cybersecurity is a geopolitical issue with global implications, such opinions were cast on the rocks by discussions this past week at the 2015 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
James McFarlin's picture
Does a dangerous threat lie with ISIS’s possible use of cyber weapons against American critical infrastructure, financial system or other targets? Will such attacks be attempted and do the capabilities exist within ISIS to do so?