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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

New York Times reporter David Sanger published a book claiming that Mandiant “hacked back” during its famous investigation into the Chinese cyber-espionage group APT1, but FireEye has denied the claims [Read More]
China-linked cyber espionage group tracked by Symantec since 2013 as Thrip has targeted satellite operators, telecommunications companies and defense contractors [Read More]
Olympic Destroyer, the malware used in a campaign targeting the recent Olympic Winter Games, has now been used in attacks aimed at bio-chemical threat research organizations in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Ukraine [Read More]
The US Senate defied President Donald Trump by voting Monday to overrule his administration's deal with Chinese telecom firm ZTE and reimpose a ban on high-tech chip sales to the company. [Read More]
In the run-up to Mexico's July 1 presidential election, a website operated by the rightist National Action Party (PAN) was taken off-line for several hours by a DDoS attack. [Read More]
DHS and FBI publish another report describing a piece of malware allegedly used by the North Korean government. The malware is tracked as 'Typeframe' [Read More]
Chinese threat actor known as APT15, Ke3chang, Mirage, Vixen Panda and Playful Dragon creates new MirageFox malware, and researchers have found similarities to the first malware used by the group [Read More]
The number of cyber-attacks targeting Singapore skyrocketed from June 11 to June 12, during the meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean President Kim Jong-un in a Singapore hotel, and most of these attacks originated from Russia [Read More]
Trend Micro analyzes new campaign that appears to be linked to MuddyWater espionage [Read More]
China-linked cyber espionage group known as LuckyMouse, Emissary Panda and APT27 targets national data center in Central Asia, likely in an effort to conduct watering hole attacks on government sites [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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Oliver Rochford's picture
All warfare is based on deception. There is sufficient evidence to prove that China utilizes cyber-espionage, but are cyber attacks being overly attributed to China?
Oliver Rochford's picture
We have an entire commercial class of security professional, but very few hackers. Where are our cyberwarriors? Where will they be when we really need them? With us, or against us?
Alan Wlasuk's picture
The world’s expectations of breach-proof SSL certification agencies have been shattered. As expected all of the ruling bodies that control the Internet have rallied to identify the root causes of these breaches and are working on future preventable mechanisms.
Idan Aharoni's picture
The worlds of counter terrorism and fraud prevention should increase their ties. Systems that are already implemented in one world may be applied to the other. Solution providers and policy makers from both worlds need to meet up and share ideas, thoughts and experience for the benefit of both.
Robert Vamosi's picture
Protecting Internet connected devices from the start and protecting them at the chip level needs to be a priority. But do we really need a full-scale cyber attack to make that so?
Alan Wlasuk's picture
Cyber Will be part of any future conflict, whether it's a nation state or terrorism, according to a long time CIA veteran. We are looking towards a time when nations will launch online attacks and extremist groups will add cyber attacks to their tactics.
Ram Mohan's picture
Soldiers more comfortable studying code on a laptop screen than staring down the sights of a rifle will play a key role in future battles. The weapons stockpiles of the future will include stashes of zero-day vulnerabilities, botnets, control codes and sophisticated malware.
Mike Lennon's picture
Many experts believe the incident was a state-sponsored attack connected to foreign governments, and though the IMF has been quiet on the issue, if this is the case, it’s likely that the attacker is an IMF member.
Irida Xheneti's picture
The risks are real, and growing more complex by the month. That doesn't mean you're powerless to keep your infrastructure and data secure.
Noa Bar-Yosef's picture
Governments around the globe are adopting very different approaches to how citizens can engage online. Sometimes it has proven to be a double-edged sword.