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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

U.S. House of Representatives passes “DHS Industrial Control Systems Capabilities Enhancement Act”, a bill aimed at protecting industrial systems against cyberattacks [Read More]
New York Times reporter David Sanger published a book claiming that Mandiant “hacked back” during its famous investigation into the Chinese cyber-espionage group APT1, but FireEye has denied the claims [Read More]
China-linked cyber espionage group tracked by Symantec since 2013 as Thrip has targeted satellite operators, telecommunications companies and defense contractors [Read More]
Olympic Destroyer, the malware used in a campaign targeting the recent Olympic Winter Games, has now been used in attacks aimed at bio-chemical threat research organizations in Germany, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland and Ukraine [Read More]
The US Senate defied President Donald Trump by voting Monday to overrule his administration's deal with Chinese telecom firm ZTE and reimpose a ban on high-tech chip sales to the company. [Read More]
In the run-up to Mexico's July 1 presidential election, a website operated by the rightist National Action Party (PAN) was taken off-line for several hours by a DDoS attack. [Read More]
DHS and FBI publish another report describing a piece of malware allegedly used by the North Korean government. The malware is tracked as 'Typeframe' [Read More]
Chinese threat actor known as APT15, Ke3chang, Mirage, Vixen Panda and Playful Dragon creates new MirageFox malware, and researchers have found similarities to the first malware used by the group [Read More]
The number of cyber-attacks targeting Singapore skyrocketed from June 11 to June 12, during the meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean President Kim Jong-un in a Singapore hotel, and most of these attacks originated from Russia [Read More]
Trend Micro analyzes new campaign that appears to be linked to MuddyWater espionage [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Eric Knapp's picture
Enemy infrastructure is and always has been an important military target. The difference is that with increasingly automated and connected infrastructure, the ability for an enemy to target these systems digitally has increased, putting these systems at greater risk.
Mark Hatton's picture
I believe that no other nation can match the capabilities of the United States military, but at the same time, matching the level of resources and investment in cyber being made by nation states such as China could prove impossible.
Danelle Au's picture
The building blocks for a robust cybersecurity strategy are not uniquely different from security requirements for a traditional enterprise...
Oliver Rochford's picture
When the Chinese government states that it is not behind most of these attacks – it is possibly telling the truth. That the Chinese government has offensive cyber capabilities are not disputed. What is not a given is that all of this activity has been officially prompted or sanctioned.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It remains to be seen how the big powers will come to agree on the precise rules to govern cyber operations – currently the international legal status is uncertain, but the little players had better concentrate on improving old and developing new defensive measures.
Oliver Rochford's picture
Cyberwar, at least the type where infrastructure or actual lives are targeted and destroyed, will not just happen for the fun of it. There are consequences to any such activity, as recent policy activity and policy makers make clear.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It is because of the ambiguities and problems of definition and categorization that an International Agreement on acceptable and agreed cyber operations is the wisest and safest course of action.
Oliver Rochford's picture
One of the main criticisms that opponents of the Cyberwar Meme raise, is that much of the reporting on the subject is sensationalist, or worse, war- or fear-mongering. Aside from the implication that anyone warning about the dangers of cyberwarfare is accused of having ulterior motives, it also implies that there is no real danger.
Matthew Stern's picture
How do reconnaissance and surveillance relate to cyber space? In traditional warfare they are key to finding the enemy or to confirm or deny their course of action. These capabilities are also essential in cyber space.