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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

UK and Australia officially blame Russia, specifically its GRU military intelligence service, for the Bad Rabbit ransomware attack and operations targeting WADA, DNC and a TV station in the UK [Read More]
Many of North Korea’s financially motivated attacks, including some previously attributed to Lazarus, have been linked by FireEye to a group named APT38 [Read More]
The United States is expected to make its offensive cyber warfare capabilities available to NATO, officials said, as the alliance seeks to strengthen its defenses against Russian electronic attacks. [Read More]
North Korea’s nuclear and missile tests have stopped, but its hacking operations to gather intelligence and raise funds for the sanction-strapped government in Pyongyang may be gathering steam [Read More]
Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee votes to approve several cybersecurity bills, including for incident response, a diagnostics and mitigation program, cyber workforce rotation, supply chain security, and safeguarding federal information systems [Read More]
The discovery of new VPNFilter modules answers most unanswered questions about the malware itself, but researchers haven’t figured out what the threat actor plans on doing next [Read More]
A former National Security Agency hacker whose leak of extremely top secret online spying materials led to the US government ban on Kaspersky software was sentenced to 66 months in prison. [Read More]
The United States is taking off the gloves in the growing, shadowy cyber war waged with China, Russia and other rivals, National Security Advisor John Bolton said. [Read More]
U.S. Department of Defense releases new cyber strategy, which supersedes the 2015 strategy, and the focus is on Russia and China [Read More]
Foreign government hackers continue to target the personal email accounts of U.S. senators and their aides — and the Senate’s security office has refused to defend them, lawmaker says [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Eric Knapp's picture
Enemy infrastructure is and always has been an important military target. The difference is that with increasingly automated and connected infrastructure, the ability for an enemy to target these systems digitally has increased, putting these systems at greater risk.
Mark Hatton's picture
I believe that no other nation can match the capabilities of the United States military, but at the same time, matching the level of resources and investment in cyber being made by nation states such as China could prove impossible.
Danelle Au's picture
The building blocks for a robust cybersecurity strategy are not uniquely different from security requirements for a traditional enterprise...
Oliver Rochford's picture
When the Chinese government states that it is not behind most of these attacks – it is possibly telling the truth. That the Chinese government has offensive cyber capabilities are not disputed. What is not a given is that all of this activity has been officially prompted or sanctioned.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It remains to be seen how the big powers will come to agree on the precise rules to govern cyber operations – currently the international legal status is uncertain, but the little players had better concentrate on improving old and developing new defensive measures.
Oliver Rochford's picture
Cyberwar, at least the type where infrastructure or actual lives are targeted and destroyed, will not just happen for the fun of it. There are consequences to any such activity, as recent policy activity and policy makers make clear.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It is because of the ambiguities and problems of definition and categorization that an International Agreement on acceptable and agreed cyber operations is the wisest and safest course of action.
Oliver Rochford's picture
One of the main criticisms that opponents of the Cyberwar Meme raise, is that much of the reporting on the subject is sensationalist, or worse, war- or fear-mongering. Aside from the implication that anyone warning about the dangers of cyberwarfare is accused of having ulterior motives, it also implies that there is no real danger.
Matthew Stern's picture
How do reconnaissance and surveillance relate to cyber space? In traditional warfare they are key to finding the enemy or to confirm or deny their course of action. These capabilities are also essential in cyber space.