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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Trend Micro analyzes new campaign that appears to be linked to MuddyWater espionage [Read More]
China-linked cyber espionage group known as LuckyMouse, Emissary Panda and APT27 targets national data center in Central Asia, likely in an effort to conduct watering hole attacks on government sites [Read More]
Australia will help fund and build an underseas communications cable to the Solomon Islands after the Pacific nation was convinced to drop a contract with Chinese company Huawei over security concerns [Read More]
ActiveX zero-day vulnerability discovered recently on the website of a South Korean think tank focused on national security has been abused by North Korea’s Lazarus group [Read More]
Chinese government hackers have stolen a massive trove of sensitive information from a US Navy contractor, including secret plans to develop a new type of submarine-launched anti-ship missile, the Washington Post reported. [Read More]
Google said it would not use artificial intelligence for weapons or to "cause or directly facilitate injury to people," as it unveiled a set of principles for these technologies. [Read More]
The developers of the Triton/Trisis ICS malware reverse engineered a legitimate library to understand the TriStation protocol used by Triconex SIS controllers [Read More]
Recent attacks launched by the Russian cyber espionage group Sofacy on foreign affairs entities in North America and Central Asia show the hackers have changed their tactics [Read More]
Security updates released by Adobe for Flash Player patch four vulnerabilities, including a zero-day exploited in targeted attacks [Read More]
Electrum, the Russia-linked hacker group responsible for the 2016 power outage in Ukraine, no longer focuses exclusively on Ukraine [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Eric Knapp's picture
Enemy infrastructure is and always has been an important military target. The difference is that with increasingly automated and connected infrastructure, the ability for an enemy to target these systems digitally has increased, putting these systems at greater risk.
Mark Hatton's picture
I believe that no other nation can match the capabilities of the United States military, but at the same time, matching the level of resources and investment in cyber being made by nation states such as China could prove impossible.
Danelle Au's picture
The building blocks for a robust cybersecurity strategy are not uniquely different from security requirements for a traditional enterprise...
Oliver Rochford's picture
When the Chinese government states that it is not behind most of these attacks – it is possibly telling the truth. That the Chinese government has offensive cyber capabilities are not disputed. What is not a given is that all of this activity has been officially prompted or sanctioned.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It remains to be seen how the big powers will come to agree on the precise rules to govern cyber operations – currently the international legal status is uncertain, but the little players had better concentrate on improving old and developing new defensive measures.
Oliver Rochford's picture
Cyberwar, at least the type where infrastructure or actual lives are targeted and destroyed, will not just happen for the fun of it. There are consequences to any such activity, as recent policy activity and policy makers make clear.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It is because of the ambiguities and problems of definition and categorization that an International Agreement on acceptable and agreed cyber operations is the wisest and safest course of action.
Oliver Rochford's picture
One of the main criticisms that opponents of the Cyberwar Meme raise, is that much of the reporting on the subject is sensationalist, or worse, war- or fear-mongering. Aside from the implication that anyone warning about the dangers of cyberwarfare is accused of having ulterior motives, it also implies that there is no real danger.
Matthew Stern's picture
How do reconnaissance and surveillance relate to cyber space? In traditional warfare they are key to finding the enemy or to confirm or deny their course of action. These capabilities are also essential in cyber space.