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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Late-state SIEM startup adds a new chief executive and banks a $200 million “growth round” investment at a $2.4 billion valuation. [Read More]
An alert released by the FBI and CISA warns that the SolarWinds hackers have abused an email marketing service to send malicious emails to 350 organizations. [Read More]
Cloud-native security analytics provider Uptycs has closed a $50 million Series C funding round, bringing the total raised by the company to date up to $93 million. [Read More]
The Russia-linked SolarWinds hackers (Nobelium) are launching new attacks on the U.S. in a campaign that abuses a mass mailing service and impersonates a government agency. [Read More]
The U.S. Justice Department announces indictments against 22 charged with purchasing and using stolen payment cards. [Read More]
NASA says it has identified more than 6,000 cyber incidents in the past 4 years and the agency says attempts to steal critical information are increasing. [Read More]
Likely state-sponsored, the threat group employs wipers in cyberattacks that masquerade as ransomware. [Read More]
Nuclear-armed North Korea is advancing on the front lines of cyberwarfare, analysts say, stealing billions of dollars and presenting a clearer and more present danger than its banned weapons programmes. [Read More]
A series of high-profile cyberattacks on targets in the West have highlighted the vulnerability of companies and institutions, making the issue a higher public priority but with no easy solution. [Read More]
US Cyber Command role is hotly debated: is it to undertake strategic attacks during war, or to constantly joust online with adversaries' military and intelligence hackers, or to go after non-military hackers like Darkside, normally the purview of law enforcement? [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cyberwarfare

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James McFarlin's picture
One can only hope our nation’s alarm clocks wake up and stir our national leaders’ imaginations before a cyber incident of the magnitude of 9/11 results in the need for a “Cyber Strikes Commission Report.”
Tal Be'ery's picture
Defenders should use their "Strategic Depth" to mitigate attacks not on the perimeter but deeper within their network where they can leverage on their strategic advantage.
Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Eric Knapp's picture
Enemy infrastructure is and always has been an important military target. The difference is that with increasingly automated and connected infrastructure, the ability for an enemy to target these systems digitally has increased, putting these systems at greater risk.
Mark Hatton's picture
I believe that no other nation can match the capabilities of the United States military, but at the same time, matching the level of resources and investment in cyber being made by nation states such as China could prove impossible.
Danelle Au's picture
The building blocks for a robust cybersecurity strategy are not uniquely different from security requirements for a traditional enterprise...
Oliver Rochford's picture
When the Chinese government states that it is not behind most of these attacks – it is possibly telling the truth. That the Chinese government has offensive cyber capabilities are not disputed. What is not a given is that all of this activity has been officially prompted or sanctioned.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It remains to be seen how the big powers will come to agree on the precise rules to govern cyber operations – currently the international legal status is uncertain, but the little players had better concentrate on improving old and developing new defensive measures.
Oliver Rochford's picture
Cyberwar, at least the type where infrastructure or actual lives are targeted and destroyed, will not just happen for the fun of it. There are consequences to any such activity, as recent policy activity and policy makers make clear.
Oliver Rochford's picture
It is because of the ambiguities and problems of definition and categorization that an International Agreement on acceptable and agreed cyber operations is the wisest and safest course of action.