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Erin O’Malley's picture

Erin O’Malley

Erin O’Malley is an incident response delivery support manager at Accenture Security, FusionX, Cyber Investigation and Forensics Response (CIFR), where she teams with incident responders and threat hunters to document and catalog incident report findings and highlight the value of taking an adversary-based approach to minimize the risk, exposure, and damage of cybersecurity incidents. Prior to joining Accenture, Erin was a security solutions marketing manager at Gigamon. Other past roles have included product marketing for virtualization and cloud security solutions at Juniper Networks and customer marketing at VMware. She has written and edited for GE Digital, WSGR, Business Objects, and the TDA Group, and holds a B.A. in French from Penn State University and an M.A. in French from Middlebury College. The opinions and statements in this column are solely those of the individual author, and do not constitute professional or legal advice, nor do they necessarily reflect the views of Accenture, its subsidiaries, or affiliates. No representations or warranties are provided, and the reader is responsible for determining whether or not to follow any of the suggestions or recommendations, entirely at their own discretion.

Recent articles by Erin O’Malley

  • Like big game hunting, cyber threat hunting is not easy and requires a unique mix of hard-earned skills and intelligence.
  • When ransomware strikes, there aren’t many options for response and recovery. Essentially, you can choose your own adventure and hope for the best.
  • SecOps and NetOps are starting to put aside their differences and find ways to work better together. As Gartner reports, these once distinct groups have begun to realize and accept that alignment is not a nice to have, but a business imperative.
  • Designed for specific purposes, security tools should be fed only the data they need to do what they do best; they shouldn’t be burdened with irrelevant data.
  • I promise to be more diligent about my personal cybersecurity, starting with five easy tasks that can help me – or anyone – improve online safety.
  • Detecting compromises requires monitoring a series of activities over time. Unfortunately, most security tools only have visibility into a certain set of activities and cannot see and comprehend the entire kill chain.
  • Can you see into all data across your network? Or does some data remain hidden due to silos between network and security operations teams?
  • Finding patterns and uncovering clues within network noise requires both broad and granular visibility into traffic (plain-text and encrypted) and is essential for defense against advanced threats.
  • The CIA conducts extensive background investigations and requires polygraph examinations to gain a security clearance, yet a malicious insider apparently made off with a trove of secret CIA hacking tools.
  • In cybersecurity, basic hygiene is a must. You could implement every eye-catching security tool on the market, but without good, clean hygiene and the ability to deliver tools the right data at the right time, they’ll never shine their brightest.
  • Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
  • Like a mist along the ground, the future will arrive and, already, predictions are being made. So whose will come true?
  • What’s worse than having to cook a Thanksgiving turkey? How about being forced to relegate the poor bird to a crock pot after discovering that your net-connected oven and wireless meat thermometer have both been hacked?
  • Visibility—delivered via a centralized platform—is the only thing that is going to bring order to the kluge that is the modern-day network.
  • A security delivery platform delivers visibility into lateral movement of attackers, accelerates detection of data theft activity, and can reduce the overhead, complexity, and costs associated with security deployments.
  • Conventional email security solutions may defend against spam, viruses, and malware, but they don’t defend against ignorance or egregious stupidity.
  • To understand SIEM, it’s important to first understand when people started to care about network security. And to do that, we need to take a step back in time.
  • Hackers are humans, too, and most humans tend to veer toward the path of least resistance. So why wouldn’t they choose an easy—and lucrative—target like a hospital?