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Virus & Threats
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

New study from Dragos shows that non-targeted malware hits roughly 3,000 unique industrial sites a year and targeted ICS attacks are not so rare [Read More]
High severity vulnerabilities in Cisco IOS allow attackers to cause a DoS condition by sending specially crafted packets [Read More]
A recently disclosed User Account Control (UAC) bypass that leverages App Paths can be used for fileless attacks as well, security researcher Matt Nelson now says. [Read More]
Researchers find serious vulnerabilities in Moodle, a popular learning platform used by many top universities [Read More]
A researcher has demonstrated an attack that combines Clickjacking and a type of Cross Site Scripting (XSS) called Self-XSS. [Read More]
Mozilla has already patched the vulnerability disclosed last week at the Pwn2Own 2017 hacking competition [Read More]
White hat hackers earned over $200,000 for exploits that allowed them to escape VMware virtual machines [Read More]
Hundreds of Cisco switches are affected by a critical zero-day vulnerability found by the vendor during its analysis of WikiLeaks’ Vault 7 files [Read More]
White hat hackers earned tens of thousands of dollars for finding critical vulnerabilities in GitHub Enterprise [Read More]
An unpatched command injection vulnerability affecting many Ubiquiti products allows attackers to hack devices [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Threats

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Jim Ivers's picture
As with any business relationship, you should use software or open source components from your allies with your eyes open to the potential risks.
Erin O’Malley's picture
What’s worse than having to cook a Thanksgiving turkey? How about being forced to relegate the poor bird to a crock pot after discovering that your net-connected oven and wireless meat thermometer have both been hacked?
Alastair Paterson's picture
Understanding what makes a good exploit kit is the first step in protecting against such attacks. But what else can you do to prevent adversaries from using exploit kits against your organization?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
The interests of the researchers should be to make the world more secure, not profit from a corporation’s vulnerabilities.
Scott Gainey's picture
There’s a difference between “nice-to-have” security products and “must-have” security products. The “must-haves” are critical to protecting organizations from cyber attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
I know I no longer have much trust in the connected devices in my home, and wonder what they do with their spare time.
Travis Greene's picture
A reliance on Internet voting with current technology will lead to the disenfranchisement of voters and manipulation by foreign or domestic attackers.
Jim Ivers's picture
Mature organizations should adopt a blended approach that employs testing tools at various stages in the development life cycle.
Scott Simkin's picture
While exploit kits are certainly contributing to the steady rise in the number of cyberattacks, in the end, the methods they use to infect endpoints and networks can be stopped provided the proper steps are taken.
David Holmes's picture
SWEET32 is probably not something that an enterprise administrator needs to lose sleep over. Very likely, we will never see a SWEET32 attack in the wild, just as we never have for POODLE or BEAST.