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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Cybercriminals combine Office exploits for CVE-2017-0199 and CVE-2012-0158 likely in an effort to avoid detection [Read More]
British researcher Marcus Hutchins pleads not guilty in US court to creating and selling the Kronos banking Trojan [Read More]
U.S. defense contractors targeted by North Korea-linked threat group known as Lazarus [Read More]
Russia-linked cyberspy group APT28 targets hotels in Europe and their main target may be government and business travelers [Read More]
Recent espionage campaigns targeting North Korea show link between KONNI malware and DarkHotel operation [Read More]
Russian citizen sentenced by US court to 46 months in prison for his role in a cybercriminal operation involving an Ebury Linux botnet [Read More]
WikiLeaks details tool used by the CIA to disable security cameras, mute microphones, and corrupt video recordings that could compromise its agents [Read More]
The NotPetya malware attack caused a disruption of worldwide operations for pharma giant Merck [Read More]
WikiLeaks publishes documents describing three tools used by the CIA to hack OS X and other POSIX systems [Read More]
Two spy hacker groups linked to Iran, OilRig and Greenbug, appear to have shared malware code [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Virus & Malware

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Zeus 2.1 now boasts features that help it avoid analysis and hostile takeover from law enforcement, researchers, or competing cybercriminal organizations.
David Harley's picture
David Harley chimes in with some thoughts on the latest developments from the AMTSO and the Anti-Malware Industry.
David Harley's picture
The vulnerability in Windows Shell’s parsing of .LNK (shortcut) files presents some interesting and novel features in terms of its media lifecycle as well as its evolution from zero-day to patched vulnerability. For most of us, the vulnerability first came to light in the context of Win32/Stuxnet, malware that in itself presents some notable quirks.
David Harley's picture
The anti-malware industry sometimes sees more complicated problems than you might imagine, and they can’t all be fixed by tweaking detection algorithms or giving the marketing team a productivity bonus.
Mike Lennon's picture
Malvertising - Popular websites, blogs, and ad networks are fast becoming the preferred means of cybercriminals, identity thieves, and hackers to steal consumer information and distribute malicious content.
Markus Jakobsson's picture
Anti-virus products scan for malware in two ways. They look for sequences of bits that are found in programs that are known to be “evil” (but which are not commonly found in “good” programs)...