Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Siemens and PAS announce strategic partnership to provide cybersecurity solutions for industrial control systems (ICS) [Read More]
Google has decided that starting with Chrome 63 resources delivered over FTP will be labeled “not secure” [Read More]
US Energy Department announces $50 million investment in tools and technology to improve resilience and security of energy infrastructure. Over $20 million allocated for cybersecurity [Read More]
A researcher has disclosed the details of several serious unpatched vulnerabilities affecting D-Link DIR-850L routers [Read More]
Smiths Medical Medfusion 4000 wireless syringe infusion pumps affected by serious flaws. Patches coming only next year [Read More]
A variant of the WireX Android botnet is able to deliver high-volume UDP Flood DDoS attacks, with a single bot capable of generating over 250GB of attack traffic per attack directive. [Read More]
Westermo patches high severity vulnerabilities found by Qualys in the company’s MRD industrial wireless routers [Read More]
Five vulnerabilities have been found in Arris-manufactured home networking equipment supplied in AT&T's U-verse service. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities in PoS systems from SAP and other vendors allow hackers to steal payment card data and change prices [Read More]
Vulnerabilities in Cisco’s IOS software expose industrial switches from Rockwell Automation to remote attacks [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Network Security

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Jennifer Blatnik's picture
While automation delivers many benefits to the enterprise, there are dangers to mindlessly automating every business function, especially when it comes to security.
Marie Hattar's picture
Full visibility is necessary when it comes to security, but some things should stay hidden. How do we see the whole network? What tools do we need? How do we stay compliant?
David Holmes's picture
Classic SSL interceptors are notoriously lackadaisical about certificate verification, but that doesn’t mean the only choice is not to use them or that they’re not needed.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
Although attackers still use malicious code quite often, they have been relying less and less on it. So how do attackers manage to be so successful without using any malware at all?
Ken McAlpine's picture
To apply an effective intent-based network security strategy to networks, security teams need to rethink how they plan, design, organize, and implement network architecture.
David Holmes's picture
Ladies and Gentlemen! Gamers and Cryptoheads! Have you ever wondered which major gaming console has the best message encryption? Well, I’m going to reveal the clear winner in my own recent personal test.
Ashley Arbuckle's picture
Generally referred to as the “attack chain,” the approach cybercriminals follow to launch and execute attacks is well-documented and includes reconnaissance, weaponization, delivery, and installation.
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Focusing on securing an endless amount of endpoints is almost impossible to do effectively. You can’t rely on the devices to be secure and you can’t rely on the consumers to secure their devices themselves.
Alan Cohen's picture
While there are clear security benefits gained through network segmentation, the principal goal of creating subnets is to improve performance, avoiding broadcast storms and latency stimulated by our insatiable requirement for bandwidth.
Rafal Los's picture
Do you ever find yourself trying to protect your organization from exotic attack scenarios that are highly unlikely or that would have a minimal impact on you?