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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Silent Circle now allows customers to make encrypted voice calls in a total of 79 countries, the company announced on Thursday.
Britain is rushing through emergency laws to ensure the police and security services can keep accessing people's Internet and mobile phone data.
A Senate committee approved the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, which aims to help companies and government share information about cyber-attacks and other threats. Privacy groups opposed the bill because it could potentially give the government access to huge trove of personal data about Americans.
The future of an open Internet faces threats from government crackdowns, and "balkanization" resulting from growing concerns over broad electronic surveillance, a survey of experts showed.
Britain's electronic eavesdropping center GCHQ faces legal action from seven internet service providers who accuse it of illegally accessing "potentially millions of people's private communications."
The NSA's vast data collection program targeting foreign nationals is a largely legal, valuable tool in fighting terrorism, a watchdog panel said Tuesday.
The US National Security Agency has been authorized to intercept information "concerning" all but four countries worldwide, top-secret documents say.
Microsoft said it is scrambling Outlook email messages in transit to thwart spying by governments or others.
SGP Technologies SA, the Switzerland-based joint venture of Silent Circle and Geeksphone, announced on Monday that Blackphone handsets are now available.
The NSA released its first "transparency report", as part of an effort to quell the firestorm over reports of its massive data collection efforts.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Mark Hatton's picture
The oversight for the protection of healthcare information is only getting tighter, and it is incumbent upon the security teams to ensure healthcare professionals have all the tools necessary to improve patient outcomes, while we worry about keeping the bad guys away.
Torsten George's picture
The NIST Cybersecurity Framework is a good first step towards creating a standardized approach to cyber security, but requires many substantial updates before really improving our nation’s cyber resilience.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
With the release of PCI-DSS 3.0, organizations have a framework for payment security as part of their business-as-usual activities by introducing more flexibility, and an increased focus on education, awareness and security as a shared responsibility.
Mark Hatton's picture
Complacency is never a good thing, but in security it can have devastating effects. While it’s good to acknowledge progress, that should never stand in the way of staying ahead of the next potential threat.
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Chris Hinkley's picture
For security professionals, PCI DSS 3.0 means that PCI compliance will become more of an everyday business practice, rather than an annual checklist obligation.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.