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Privacy & Compliance
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Many US lawmakers and an array of interest groups want to rein in the government's surveillance programs, aware of public backlash that began with bombshell leaks two years ago.
A widening scandal over claims Germany helped the US spy on European targets triggered tensions in Angela Merkel's coalition Tuesday, which analysts said could potentially prove dangerous for the "untouchable" chancellor.
A US House of Representatives committee advanced a bill to scale back bulk surveillance efforts following leaks of the programs by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.
Germany's BND foreign intelligence agency helped the NSA carry out "political espionage" by surveilling "top officials at the French Foreign Ministry.
Mozilla will remove the CA certificate of Turkish company E-Guven in Firefox due to outdated and insufficient audits.
Google's Gerhard Eschelbeck holds the reins of security and privacy for all-things Google. In an exclusive interview with, Eschelbeck spoke of using Google's massive scope to protect users from cyber villains such as spammers and state-sponsored spies.
A new GAO report says Internet connectivity could potentially allow malicious actors to access the aircraft avionics systems in modern airplanes.
An Austrian law graduate spearheading a class action case against Facebook for alleged privacy breaches officially filed the suit in a Vienna court.
Activist groups unveiled a new coalition aimed at repealing the law authorizing mass surveillance by US intelligence and law enforcement agencies.
Americans might oppose intrusive surveillance if they realized the government can see their most intimate emailed pictures, comic John Oliver suggested to fugitive intelligence technician Edward Snowden.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy & Compliance

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Torsten George's picture
The NIST Cybersecurity Framework is an important building block, but still just the first step towards implementing operationalized defenses against cyber security risks.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Marcus Ranum's picture
To communicate about our metrics, we need ways that we can ground our experience in terms of “normal” for us; Otherwise, we really can't communicate our metrics effectively with anyone who isn't in a similar environment.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.
Mark Hatton's picture
The oversight for the protection of healthcare information is only getting tighter, and it is incumbent upon the security teams to ensure healthcare professionals have all the tools necessary to improve patient outcomes, while we worry about keeping the bad guys away.
Torsten George's picture
The NIST Cybersecurity Framework is a good first step towards creating a standardized approach to cyber security, but requires many substantial updates before really improving our nation’s cyber resilience.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
With the release of PCI-DSS 3.0, organizations have a framework for payment security as part of their business-as-usual activities by introducing more flexibility, and an increased focus on education, awareness and security as a shared responsibility.
Mark Hatton's picture
Complacency is never a good thing, but in security it can have devastating effects. While it’s good to acknowledge progress, that should never stand in the way of staying ahead of the next potential threat.
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.