Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Industry professionals comment on the Equifax hack, which may affect as many as 143 million people [Read More]
Europe's top rights court on Sept. 5 restricted the ability of employers to snoop on their staff's private messages, in a landmark ruling with wide ramifications for privacy in the workplace. [Read More]
Lenovo settles FTC charges over the Superfish adware shipped with many of its laptops, but the company will not pay a fine [Read More]
Hackers are selling phone numbers and email addresses of millions of celebrities and other high profile Instagram users [Read More]
Details of thousands of U.S. military veterans and law enforcement officers looking for a job at an international security firm leaked online via unprotected AWS storage [Read More]
Europe's top human rights court is set to rule Tuesday whether bosses have the right to spy on employees who use company messaging systems, in a landmark decision for privacy in the work place. [Read More]
Russia-linked Fancy Bear hackers leak emails and medical records on football (soccer) players caught using illegal substances [Read More]
Fuze patches several vulnerabilities discovered by Rapid7 in its online customer portal, including authentication, access control and data transmission issues [Read More]
Hackers can use replacement touchscreens to take complete control of smartphones and tablets, researchers warn [Read More]
TunnelBear commissioned an audit of its VPN product and only few vulnerabilities were found in recent versions [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

rss icon

Jennifer Blatnik's picture
Protecting this data is a necessity as more and more consumers are voluntarily offering up their rights to security or privacy in search for convenience.
Lance Cottrell's picture
By surreptitiously monitoring and engaging with potential attackers and malware developers you can successfully gain information about emerging attack methods, patterns, and practices in the cyber underground.
Jim Ivers's picture
With the advent of connected devices, privacy and security have become tightly linked because theft of private data is often the goal of malicious attacks.
Jim Ivers's picture
Enlightened toy manufacturers likely begin to embrace the basic concepts of IoT security and build connected toys that can be trusted by parents.
Erin O’Malley's picture
Today, we expect ultimate convenience. But at what cost? More and more, I’m left wondering whether modern conveniences—grâce à today’s advanced technologies—are truly worth the risk.
Jim Ivers's picture
If a car’s systems can be hacked to disable critical systems, then attacks can also be used to extract information. Similar to IoT, if data is being collected, data can be exfiltrated.
David Holmes's picture
The portion of encrypted traffic keeps rising, so IT security administrators will be forced to do more SSL decryption if they are to get any value at all out of their fancy security tools.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.