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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The best possible method to mitigate the risk of the new European Data Protection law will be the ability to demonstrate a serious attempt at good security policy. [Read More]
The California Assembly Bill 1681 was quietly dropped this week without a vote. The bill would have authorized $2,500 penalties for phone manufacturers and operating system providers if they do not comply with court orders to decrypt phones. [Read More]
US lawmakers unveiled legislation to require technology firms to help law enforcement unlock encrypted devices -- prompting a fierce outcry from the industry and privacy activists. [Read More]
Privacy Shield, the proposed replacement for the US/EU Safe Harbor agreement, is being heavily criticized by European regulators. [Read More]
WhatsApp has implemented "full end-to-end encryption," a move which steps up privacy but may lead to conflicts with law enforcement agencies. [Read More]
The high-stakes legal showdown between Apple and the FBI has abruptly ended, with no resolution to key questions about law enforcement access to devices with strong encryption. [Read More]
Apple and the US government are squaring off in an epic legal battle with wide-ranging implications for how technology firms must work with law enforcement. [Read More]
Apple chief Tim Cook went public Wednesday in his battle with the FBI, saying that unlocking an iPhone in the name of fighting terrorism would be "bad for America." [Read More]
Versions of Baidu Browser for Android and Windows devices are collecting a large amount of personally identifiable data and transmits it to Baidu servers without encryption, Citizen Lab researchers have discovered. [Read More]
Apple said it would accept having a panel of experts consider access to encrypted devices if US authorities drop efforts to force it to help break into the iPhone of a California attacker. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.