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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The top US and European trade groups have warned their leaders of enormous fallout for businesses and customers if the two sides fail to reach a new deal on data transfers by end January. [Read More]
Would you allow your insurance company to monitor your driving for a discount? Or let a "smart thermostat" save energy by tracking your family's movements around your home? [Read More]
David Chaum, inventor of various cryptographic protocols with more than 30 years of experience in the field, has introduced a new anonymous communications project. [Read More]
Apple criticized draft British legislation designed to stiffen surveillance powers, saying the proposed bill could "spark serious international conflicts". [Read More]
Canadian smartphone maker BlackBerry is determined to help law enforcement and government agencies in their investigations even when that means breaking its commitment to privacy, John Chen, the company’s CEO says. [Read More]
Twitter over the weekend sent notifications to several users warning them that their accounts might be the targets of state sponsored attacks. [Read More]
With renewed focus on how encrypted messages can be used to plot terrorist attacks, President Barack Obama's administration is stepping up pressure on the tech sector to help in the battle. [Read More]
Open Whisper Systems announced the release of Signal Desktop, their encrypted messaging application for desktop computers. [Read More]
The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) has filed a complaint with the United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC), claiming that Google is spying on students with the help of Chromebooks. [Read More]
BlackBerry cease offering its services in Pakistan starting Dec. 30, 2015 after refusing the government’s demand for a backdoor into its encrypted communication service. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
U.S tech giants are playing a game of high-stakes global brinksmanship around who has rights to control their data, which impacts their European growth prospects, business models, and ultimately stock valuations.
Adam Firestone's picture
The misconception that Internet privacy equals anonymity must be dispelled if cyberspace is to be a secure and safe place. At the same time, mechanisms must be incorporated to ensure that communications remain confidential and resistant to unauthorized alteration by third parties.
Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.