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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Apple will let you unlock the iPhone X with your face -- a move likely to bring facial recognition to the masses, along with concerns over how the technology may be used for nefarious purposes. [Read More]
A law coming into force will give the Kremlin greater control over what Russians can access online ahead of a presidential election next March. [Read More]
DUHK attack: vulnerability in outdated X9.31 random number generator allows hackers to recover encryption keys and read VPN and web browsing session data [Read More]
Microsoft drops lawsuit against US government after DoJ issued new rules limiting the use of secrecy orders that prevent firms from telling customers law enforcement accessed their data [Read More]
UK's Financial Conduct Authority launches investigation into massive Equifax breach [Read More]
Proposed European Union ePrivacy regulation, whose goal is to harmonize e-communications confidentiality laws, edges closer to fruition [Read More]
Kaspersky launches new Global Transparency Initiative, which includes independent source code reviews and bug bounties of up to $100,000 [Read More]
Google says roughly two-thirds of the websites loaded through Chrome use HTTPS by default [Read More]
Visa launches ID Intelligence, a new platform that allows card issuers, acquirers and merchants to adopt new biometric methods of their own preference [Read More]
The continuing battle between the U.S. government and Microsoft over access to private emails stored in Ireland is going to the Supreme Court. The case was accepted by the Supreme Court on Monday. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Privacy

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Tal Be'ery's picture
The Google-backed "Certificate Transparency" initiative has gained much momentum and may have a real chance to amend the battered Public-Key Infrastructure (PKI).
Chris Coleman's picture
The events that occurred in 2013 will forever be reflected in the Internet DNA of the future, and how the cyber security market evolves to accommodate that future.
Gant Redmon's picture
Proper use of Google Glass respecting law and privacy will be all about context. Context is different depending where you are. Are you in a public place, a private place, or a restricted place like a government installation?
Ram Mohan's picture
There is a lot we can do to keep our data private and, like many aspects of managing security, it’s a process that is best grounded in common sense. What can organizations do to shield themselves from the kind of scrutiny that has caught the world’s attention recently?
Michael Callahan's picture
There’s more than functionality and availability issues ailing Healthcare.gov. There’s significant potential for compromise.
Gant Redmon's picture
In today's world, people are screaming “Privacy!” but it’s confusing who they’re screaming at. That’s why I thought I’d pen a timely guide to the current privacy outrage. Confusion stems from there being four plot lines going at the same time.
Mike Tierney's picture
It is difficult to argue against the fact that in today's world organizations need to deploy at least some level of activity monitoring to protect themselves against the insider threat, other cyber risks and productivity loss.
Gant Redmon's picture
While you can’t do anything about the terms when using a product or service, you can decide whether or not to get into the contractual relationship in the first place and what information you share if you do click through.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Gant Redmon's picture
Parenting, much like our legal system, is founded on three basic steps: 1) establish rules, 2) monitor compliance, and 3) modify non-compliant behavior.