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VMware has released an update to its AirWatch enterprise mobile management and security platform to address information disclosure vulnerabilities.
The creators of the Android remote administration tool (RAT) called DroidJack started off as legitimate application developers, but when they realized that their products were not as successful as they had hoped, they turned to developing a crimeware tool.
Mobile security firm Lookout warned that Android-powered smartphones or tablets are being targeted with mobile malware called "NotCompatible" that puts them at the mercy of hacker overlords.
Apple's first update for the iOS 8.1 mobile operating system includes bug fixes, increased stability and performance improvements for older devices, and also addresses several security issues.
A new variant of the NotCompatible malware targeting Android devices is a threat to corporate networks because it's difficult to detect and block by network-based security systems.
According to a report from Arxan Technologies, hacked versions of 97% of the top 100 paid Android apps and 87% of the top 100 paid Apple iOS apps appear in unofficial app stores and app distribution sites.
Three individuals suspected of being involved in the creation and distribution of a recently uncovered piece of malware referred to as "WireLurker" have been arrested and charged, the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Public Security said on Friday.
BlackBerry announced several new offerings targeted to its enterprise customers, including two identity and access solutions, along with a new enterprise mobility management (EMM) solution.
Snapchat has started actively warning users when the use of a third party app is detected.
Researchers hacked several of the latest popular smartphones during the Mobile Pwn2Own competition that took place alongside the PacSec Applied Security Conference in Tokyo on November 12-13.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Adam Ely's picture
CISOs are notoriously disliked. Trying to protect company, customer and employee data often means having to say “no” to new projects and implementations. This does not earn you many friends.
Ryan Naraine's picture
John Hultquist, Manager of Cyber Espionage Threat Intelligence at ISIGHT Partners, joins the podcast to talk about "NEWSCASTER," a cyber espionage operation that uses fictitious social media accounts to launch attacks.
Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.
Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Security is a creature of habit. Security likes things to stay the same. Change brings chaos. Chaos is bad for security. But, we can help control the security of our environment by following good security habits.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.