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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Google has released its November 2016 Android security patches to resolve 83 vulnerabilities in the mobile operating system, 23 of which have been rated Critical. [Read More]
A newly discovered Android spyware believed to be targeting high-level executives, but requires manual installation on devices. [Read More]
The recently disclosed "Trident" 0-day vulnerabilities that put owners of iOS devices were patched in August, but the full technical details on them have been released only this week. [Read More]
While Google has been releasing monthly Android patches for over a year, the overall impact on device security has been much lower than expected, and actually led to fragmentation, security researchers argue. [Read More]
Unknown sources account for hundreds of thousands of Trojan installations on Android devices. [Read More]
The Safari browser in iOS 10 no longer offers the same level of privacy as before when it comes to Private Browsing, a researcher has discovered. [Read More]
Apple’s iMessage service can leak data such as location, device type, and operating system, when the user receives a URL in a message, a researcher has discovered. [Read More]
Security researchers from Viral Security Group Ltd. have managed to bypass the Samsung KNOX security features by exploiting vulnerabilities that render unpatched devices susceptible to compromise. [Read More]
Google this week released another set of monthly patches for the Android mobile operating system, in an attempt to address no less than 78 security vulnerabilities. [Read More]
A recently discovered mobile malware family called DressCode has infected over 400 applications that are being distributed via Google Play. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Marc Solomon's picture
To help cybersecurity professionals cut through the hype and gain a better understanding of what to expect as the Internet of Everything continues to evolve, these top 10 observations might help.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.
Adam Ely's picture
Many of us create our own blind spots through assumption. Until we understand what is occurring on mobile devices, we cannot determine if our controls are effective at managing risk.
Adam Ely's picture
CISOs are notoriously disliked. Trying to protect company, customer and employee data often means having to say “no” to new projects and implementations. This does not earn you many friends.
Ryan Naraine's picture
John Hultquist, Manager of Cyber Espionage Threat Intelligence at ISIGHT Partners, joins the podcast to talk about "NEWSCASTER," a cyber espionage operation that uses fictitious social media accounts to launch attacks.