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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Apple is rolling out new privacy protections for iPhones and iPads, with a new system that makes it impossible for the company to unlock a device even with a warrant.
iOS 8, the eighth major release of iOS of Apple's Mobile OS, comes with fixes for more than 50 security vulnerabilities.
Gartner believes that through 2015, over 75% of mobile applications will fail basic security tests.
Apple is ramping up iCloud defenses in the aftermath of hackers swiping nude photos of celebrities from the online digital vault, the Wall Street Journal reported.
The CERT Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University (CERT/CC) has published a list of popular Android applications that fail to properly validate SSL certificates, exposing users to man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks.
The third edition of Mobile Pwn2Own will take place on November 12-13 alongside the PacSec Applied Security Conference in Tokyo with a prize pool of $425,000.
Mobile security firm Lookout announced this week that it will open a new Technology Development Center located in Boston, Mass.
Researchers at Trend Micro have uncovered a security hole that can be exploited to launch phishing attacks against users who make payments from their Android mobile devices.
Researchers have developed a new attack method that can be used to obtain sensitive information from applications running on Android and likely other operating systems.
NIST is requesting public comments on a guide designed to help organizations determine potential security and privacy risks posed by third-party mobile applications

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile & Wireless

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Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.
Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Security is a creature of habit. Security likes things to stay the same. Change brings chaos. Chaos is bad for security. But, we can help control the security of our environment by following good security habits.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.