Security Experts:

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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Billions of devices may be exposed to a new and stealthy Bluetooth attack that can be carried out without any user interaction [Read More]
Smiths Medical Medfusion 4000 wireless syringe infusion pumps affected by serious flaws. Patches coming only next year [Read More]
Hackers can send inaudible commands to Siri, Google Now, Cortana, Alexa and Audi’s speech recognition system via ultrasound [Read More]
Westermo patches high severity vulnerabilities found by Qualys in the company’s MRD industrial wireless routers [Read More]
A spate of incidents involving US warships in Asia, including a deadly collision this week off Singapore, has forced the navy to consider whether cyberattackers might be to blame [Read More]
Russia-linked cyberspy group APT28 targets hotels in Europe and their main target may be government and business travelers [Read More]
Bitdefender and Checkmarx publish reports describing vulnerabilities they found in popular Neo, VStarcam and Loftek IP cameras [Read More]
BMW, Ford, Infiniti and Nissan cars with a Continental telematics control unit could be vulnerable to remote hacker attacks [Read More]
Vulnerabilities found by researchers in the Segway miniPRO allow hackers to take control of the hoverboard and possibly cause injury to the rider [Read More]
A vulnerability dubbed by researchers Devil’s Ivy could affect millions of security cameras and other IoT devices [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Wireless Security

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Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Security is a creature of habit. Security likes things to stay the same. Change brings chaos. Chaos is bad for security. But, we can help control the security of our environment by following good security habits.
Ram Mohan's picture
Do you allow your employees to surf using open wireless networks from their phones or laptops? What are the easiest ways that attackers can sniff email or gain access to corporate information from these devices? What are the best ways to protect corporation information on the go?
Mike Lennon's picture
Enjoy this selection of top picks for 2010, listed in no particular order. Happy New Year!
Markus Jakobsson's picture
In 1998, Intel announced the introduction of processor identities. Anti-fraud practitioners celebrated, security experts busied themselves thinking of the research implications, and privacy advocates were terrified...