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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The head of a company that develops and sells spying software for mobile devices has been indicted in the Eastern District of Virginia in what's said to be the first-ever criminal case involving the advertisement and sale of mobile spyware.
FBI director James Comey hit out at Apple and Google over new data-security measures designed to reassure customers wary of government prying.
In a recent survey, 52 percent of respondents said they had to scale back on the security protections used on mobile devices in order to boost employee productivity.
Google said Thursday it would beef up encryption of its mobile operating system, so that it would not hold "keys" to devices even if it is served with a warrant.
Apple is rolling out new privacy protections for iPhones and iPads, with a new system that makes it impossible for the company to unlock a device even with a warrant.
Gartner believes that through 2015, over 75% of mobile applications will fail basic security tests.
Apple is ramping up iCloud defenses in the aftermath of hackers swiping nude photos of celebrities from the online digital vault, the Wall Street Journal reported.
The CERT Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University (CERT/CC) has published a list of popular Android applications that fail to properly validate SSL certificates, exposing users to man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks.
The third edition of Mobile Pwn2Own will take place on November 12-13 alongside the PacSec Applied Security Conference in Tokyo with a prize pool of $425,000.
Researchers at Trend Micro have uncovered a security hole that can be exploited to launch phishing attacks against users who make payments from their Android mobile devices.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.
Adam Ely's picture
Many of us create our own blind spots through assumption. Until we understand what is occurring on mobile devices, we cannot determine if our controls are effective at managing risk.
Adam Ely's picture
CISOs are notoriously disliked. Trying to protect company, customer and employee data often means having to say “no” to new projects and implementations. This does not earn you many friends.
Ryan Naraine's picture
John Hultquist, Manager of Cyber Espionage Threat Intelligence at ISIGHT Partners, joins the podcast to talk about "NEWSCASTER," a cyber espionage operation that uses fictitious social media accounts to launch attacks.
Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.