Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A newly discovered Android ransomware family employs heavy obfuscation and delayed activation of malicious functionality to ensure it can evade mobile anti-virus solutions. [Read More]
Project Zero Prize: Google offered hundreds of thousands of dollars for Android exploits, but received no valid entries [Read More]
President Donald Trump has a new iPhone. That would not ordinarily be news, but given the security concerns about the risk of hack attacks on the prolific White House tweeter, the shift is significant. [Read More]
A third-party app store application managed to slip into the official iOS App Store by masquerading as a legitimate financial helper application, according to Trend Micro researchers. [Read More]
The server hosting Android Forums was hacked and the website’s database was accessed. Only 2.5% of active users affected [Read More]
Apple’s initial analysis shows that the iPhone and Mac exploits disclosed by WikiLeaks have already been patched, and the company told WikiLeaks to submit vulnerabilities through the normal process [Read More]
WikiLeaks releases documents describing Apple device hacking tools used by the CIA. Most require physical access to the targeted device [Read More]
Over the last year, Google has improved the discovery and responsible disclosure of vulnerabilities in its partners' products; and improved on the speed and regularity of device patching. [Read More]
Google recently discovered and blocked the Chamois botnet, which was being distributed through multiple channels and employed several methods to avoid detection. [Read More]
Malware was recently discovered on 38 Android devices belonging to a large telecommunications company and a multinational technology company. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

rss icon

Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.
Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.
Gant Redmon's picture
Being in a public place makes you fair game. So what makes a place private instead of public? This is where that famed “reasonable person” comes in.