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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

US government drops another iPhone cracking case against Apple after receiving the phone’s passcode [Read More]
The Federal Bureau of Investigation paid hackers more than $1 million to break into the iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino attackers, director James Comey said Thursday. [Read More]
Smartphones can be easily tracked by leveraging an old, yet unpatched security vulnerability in global cellular networks, a researcher has demonstrated. [Read More]
In its Android Security Year In Review report for 2015, Google presented some of the main changes brought to the mobile operating system. [Read More]
Apple on Tuesday denied providing Chinese authorities with special access to its devices, as the iPhone maker defended its position on encryption and cooperation with US law enforcement. [Read More]
The threat group behind Operation C-Major has used Android and BlackBerry spyware against targets in India [Read More]
The California Assembly Bill 1681 was quietly dropped this week without a vote. The bill would have authorized $2,500 penalties for phone manufacturers and operating system providers if they do not comply with court orders to decrypt phones. [Read More]
An unpatched iPhone 6s vulnerability can be exploited to bypass the lockscreen and access photos and contacts [Read More]
The April 2016 Nexus Security Bulletin resolves a total of 39 vulnerabilities in Android, 15 of which are rated Critical, 16 High, and 8 Moderate. [Read More]
FireEye researchers detail another iOS app hot-patching solution that can be abused for malicious purposes [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.
Gant Redmon's picture
Being in a public place makes you fair game. So what makes a place private instead of public? This is where that famed “reasonable person” comes in.
Avi Chesla's picture
While Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks bring the promise of relieving traffic jams for mobile operators, they also entail new security risks.