Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Zach Lanier, senior security researcher at Duo Security, talks about a gaping hole in the way two-factor authentication is implemented in the PayPal mobile app (iOS and Android).
Organizations need to expand their mobile worldview to include data leakage, insider threats, and mobile malware and develop incident response plans that consider mobile devices.
Security researchers at mobile software company Cheetah Mobile have identified a piece of Android malware that's designed to steal the personal and financial details of South Korean online banking customers.
Bluebox Security unveiled the latest release of its flagship security platform this week, which now gives customers the ability to fortify mobile applications with self-defense capabilities, along with other new security features.
Researchers from Kaspersky Lab and Citizen Lab have uncovered new details on advanced surveillance tools offered by the Italian company HackingTeam, including never before seen implants for smartphones running on iOS and Android.
Cybercriminals are increasingly abusing flaws in trusted mobile apps and services in an effort to distribute malware.
Google has recently made changes to the way permissions for Android applications are displayed, but experts warn that the modifications make automatic updating of mobile applications riskier than before.
Malware authors have developed a new version of the Svpeng Android Trojan, which they’re currently using to target users in the United States.
Mojave Networks has added a new feature to the company’s professional and enterprise services in an effort to help organizations minimize the risks posed by the mobile applications used by their employees.
While most organizations have patched the Heartbleed bug in their OpenSSL installations, a security expert has uncovered new vectors for exploiting the vulnerability, which can impact enterprise wireless networks, Android devices, and other connected devices.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

rss icon

Nick Cavalancia's picture
Company Owned, Personally Enabled devices (COPE) provide a high-degree of centralized control and monitoring while allowing employees to install consumerized, personal-use applications.
Nick Cavalancia's picture
There is no way to deal with the risk that BYOD brings. Between Android and iOS, there are millions of apps readily available for download, countless numbers of which open up doors in BYOD technologies that hackers and cybercriminals can easily stroll through.
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
From a security perspective, most consumer devices and services leave much to be desired. The tools at the disposal of security professionals for dealing with consumerization are quite limited and include the ability to Block it, Wrap it, or Allow it and pray.
Dr. Mike Lloyd's picture
The BYOD problem isn’t even about BYOD; it’s about the ability to visualize, understand, and control your whole infrastructure, including this latest addition to the network map.
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
While BYOD is concerned with the risk from personal devices, BYON (Bring Your Own Network) is a different type of risk
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
If regulatory protected information gets onto your device, you are obligated to protect it. Are you fully prepared to guarantee that everything you are doing on your personally managed device meets the obligations of you and your organization to protect sensitive information?
Chris Poulin's picture
Before you join the stampede with all the organizations who have bought into the concept of unifying personal and business devices, consider that one size can risk all.
Marc Solomon's picture
Organizations need to understand the security gaps the Mobile Enterprise presents and embrace a combination of security tools and techniques to bridge these gaps.
Johnnie Konstantas's picture
How can you defend against a new generation of threats and attackers that are leveraging automation and outpacing alerting mechanisms and manual-access controls?
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Hacking a phone is one thing, but hacking voicemail is something else, and while your voicemail does have some protection, breaking into it is not very complicated.