Security Experts:

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A newly spotted Android Trojan managed to infect over 150 applications in Google Play, for a total of more than 2.8 million downloads, Doctor Web security researchers warn. [Read More]
Microsoft recently disabled the cloud sync feature in SwiftKey after an issue resulted in user details being displayed to other people. [Read More]
Google is looking into lowering the number of entry points to the kernel through removing code, removing access to entry points, or selectively exposing features. [Read More]
A malicious Android application distributed via Google Play and posing as a development tool was found to have been stealing users’ media files for over a year, researchers at Symantec warn. [Read More]
BlackBerry is calling the DTEK50 'the world's most secure Android Smartphone'. It comes with Android Marshmallow 6.0 underwritten by BlackBerry's security experience. [Read More]
Google is planning to prevent devices with a corrupt or modified boot image from booting in the upcoming Android 7.0 mobile operating systems. [Read More]
Researchers have found a fake lockscreen app in Google Play under the name of Pokemon Go Ultimate. [Read More]
Nearly one million Android users have fallen victims to eight fake applications that falsely claimed to help them gain more followers on social networks, but instead stole their information and money. [Read More]
Symantec researchers have discovered a Trojan that prevents users from making outgoing calls to banks from their smartphones. [Read More]
A modified Pokémon GO APK packing the malicious remote access tool (RAT) called DroidJack was spotted less than 72 hours after the game was officially released. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.
Gant Redmon's picture
Being in a public place makes you fair game. So what makes a place private instead of public? This is where that famed “reasonable person” comes in.
Avi Chesla's picture
While Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks bring the promise of relieving traffic jams for mobile operators, they also entail new security risks.