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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The head of a company that develops and sells spying software for mobile devices has been indicted in the Eastern District of Virginia in what's said to be the first-ever criminal case involving the advertisement and sale of mobile spyware.
FBI director James Comey hit out at Apple and Google over new data-security measures designed to reassure customers wary of government prying.
In a recent survey, 52 percent of respondents said they had to scale back on the security protections used on mobile devices in order to boost employee productivity.
Google said Thursday it would beef up encryption of its mobile operating system, so that it would not hold "keys" to devices even if it is served with a warrant.
Apple is rolling out new privacy protections for iPhones and iPads, with a new system that makes it impossible for the company to unlock a device even with a warrant.
Gartner believes that through 2015, over 75% of mobile applications will fail basic security tests.
Apple is ramping up iCloud defenses in the aftermath of hackers swiping nude photos of celebrities from the online digital vault, the Wall Street Journal reported.
The CERT Coordination Center at Carnegie Mellon University (CERT/CC) has published a list of popular Android applications that fail to properly validate SSL certificates, exposing users to man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks.
The third edition of Mobile Pwn2Own will take place on November 12-13 alongside the PacSec Applied Security Conference in Tokyo with a prize pool of $425,000.
Researchers at Trend Micro have uncovered a security hole that can be exploited to launch phishing attacks against users who make payments from their Android mobile devices.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Avi Chesla's picture
While Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks bring the promise of relieving traffic jams for mobile operators, they also entail new security risks.
Nick Cavalancia's picture
Company Owned, Personally Enabled devices (COPE) provide a high-degree of centralized control and monitoring while allowing employees to install consumerized, personal-use applications.
Nick Cavalancia's picture
There is no way to deal with the risk that BYOD brings. Between Android and iOS, there are millions of apps readily available for download, countless numbers of which open up doors in BYOD technologies that hackers and cybercriminals can easily stroll through.
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
From a security perspective, most consumer devices and services leave much to be desired. The tools at the disposal of security professionals for dealing with consumerization are quite limited and include the ability to Block it, Wrap it, or Allow it and pray.
Dr. Mike Lloyd's picture
The BYOD problem isn’t even about BYOD; it’s about the ability to visualize, understand, and control your whole infrastructure, including this latest addition to the network map.
Nimmy Reichenberg's picture
While BYOD is concerned with the risk from personal devices, BYON (Bring Your Own Network) is a different type of risk
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
If regulatory protected information gets onto your device, you are obligated to protect it. Are you fully prepared to guarantee that everything you are doing on your personally managed device meets the obligations of you and your organization to protect sensitive information?
Chris Poulin's picture
Before you join the stampede with all the organizations who have bought into the concept of unifying personal and business devices, consider that one size can risk all.
Marc Solomon's picture
Organizations need to understand the security gaps the Mobile Enterprise presents and embrace a combination of security tools and techniques to bridge these gaps.
Johnnie Konstantas's picture
How can you defend against a new generation of threats and attackers that are leveraging automation and outpacing alerting mechanisms and manual-access controls?