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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

C-level executives are by far at the greatest risk of being hacked outside of the office, according to a new report. [Read More]
White hat hackers show how easy it is to bypass the iris recognition system on Samsung’s Galaxy S8 smartphones [Read More]
Google this week launched a set of security services designed to bring improved protection and visibility for Android users. [Read More]
Mobile security is improving, but unprotected communication paths leave the ecosystem vulnerable, a recent report from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) found out. [Read More]
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is funding three smartphone digital identity and privacy projects including mobile device attribute verification, mobile authentication, and physical access control. [Read More]
More than 50 applications distributed via Google Play have exposed tens of millions of Android users to a piece of adware (Android XavirAd) packed inside the apps. [Read More]
Risks posed by SS7 flaws are no longer just theoretical – cybercriminals exploited vulnerabilities to steal money from bank accounts [Read More]
Google this week announced the contents of the May 2017 Android security patches, revealing that six Critical Remote Code Execution (RCE) flaws were addressed in the Mediaserver component. [Read More]
Vulnerabilities in Hyundai remote access app allowed hackers to locate, unlock and start a targeted vehicle [Read More]
Millions of users looking to get Android software updates have been tricked into downloading spyware on their devices through the Google Play marketplace, Zscaler reveals. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Danelle Au's picture
Enterprises must find the right balance to deliver a mobile security environment that meets productivity and flexibility needs without putting devices, apps, or data at risk.
Ryan Naraine's picture
In this podcast, Richard Boscovich, assistant general counsel in the Microsoft Digital Crimes Unit, talks about the new Microsoft Cybercrime Center and the ongoing battle to stop the proliferation of botnets around the world.
Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.