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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A new iOS lockscreen bypass technique gives access to contacts and photos on iPhones and iPads [Read More]
Multiple Android mobile device models sold in the United States have been recently found to include a backdoor in their firmware and to send personally identifiable information (PII) to third-party servers without disclosure or the users' consent. [Read More]
Cybercriminals delivered the Svpeng Trojan to Android users via Google AdSense and a zero-day flaw in Chrome [Read More]
Google has released its November 2016 Android security patches to resolve 83 vulnerabilities in the mobile operating system, 23 of which have been rated Critical. [Read More]
A newly discovered Android spyware believed to be targeting high-level executives, but requires manual installation on devices. [Read More]
The recently disclosed "Trident" 0-day vulnerabilities that put owners of iOS devices were patched in August, but the full technical details on them have been released only this week. [Read More]
While Google has been releasing monthly Android patches for over a year, the overall impact on device security has been much lower than expected, and actually led to fragmentation, security researchers argue. [Read More]
Unknown sources account for hundreds of thousands of Trojan installations on Android devices. [Read More]
The Safari browser in iOS 10 no longer offers the same level of privacy as before when it comes to Private Browsing, a researcher has discovered. [Read More]
Apple’s iMessage service can leak data such as location, device type, and operating system, when the user receives a URL in a message, a researcher has discovered. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Wade Williamson's picture
If you are going to analyze network traffic for hidden malware or look for anomalous behaviors that indicate an infection, you should be sure to include mobile devices and mobile malware in your efforts.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Vinnie Liu from Bishop Fox joins Ryan Naraine on the podcast to warn businesses about the security risks associated with the new LinkedIn Intro application.
Torsten George's picture
Many security experts believe the next wave of enterprise hacking will be carried out via the mobile channel. What steps can be taken to maintain the productivity gains and cost-savings associated with BYOD, while proactively managing and mitigating security risks associated with this practice?
Ryan Naraine's picture
Costin Raiu of Kaspersky Lab's global research and analysis team talks about the global implications of the Icefog APT campaign and discloses that a major command-and-control shutdown is currently underway.
Michael Callahan's picture
The problem with this Internet of Things is that the manufacturers of "smart" devices are not always as concerned about security as we end-users might want them to be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Jerry Bryant, Senior Security Strategist in the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing group chats about the company's thinking behind the expansion of the Microsoft Active Protections Program (MAPP).
Wade Williamson's picture
As security professionals, it’s our job to see around the corner whenever possible. While the sky is not falling, if controlling mobile malware isn’t on your radar, it definitely should be.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Security researchers Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek join the podcast to talk about their work hacking the into modern vehicles to manipulate steering, acceleration, speedometers and safety sensors.
Gant Redmon's picture
Being in a public place makes you fair game. So what makes a place private instead of public? This is where that famed “reasonable person” comes in.
Avi Chesla's picture
While Long Term Evolution (LTE) networks bring the promise of relieving traffic jams for mobile operators, they also entail new security risks.