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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Seventy-five percent of 300 Android apps tested by Exodus Privacy and analyzed by the Yale Privacy Lab contain embedded trackers. [Read More]
Researchers discovered new Android malware apparently being used by the North Korea-linked Lazarus group to target users in South Korea [Read More]
A vulnerability that allows malicious applications to capture screen contents and record audio without a user’s knowledge impacts over 78% of Android devices, researchers claim. [Read More]
Website performance optimization and security firm Cloudflare has expanded its reach to mobile with the acquisition of Neumob. [Read More]
Face ID, the facial biometric unlocking technology included in Apple’s recently laucnhed iPhone X, can be bypassed using a mask, security researchers have discovered. [Read More]
Following an increase in Android malware and adware abusing accessibility services, Google decides to crack down on apps that misuse the feature [Read More]
Researchers spot first Android malware to exploit a recently patched Toast vulnerability [Read More]
Google released its November 2017 set of security patches for Android to address 31 vulnerabilities, 9 of which are remote code execution issues rated Critical severity. [Read More]
Samsung Galaxy S8, iPhone 7 and Huawei Mate 9 Pro exploits earn hackers more than $500,000 at the Mobile Pwn2Own 2017 competition [Read More]
White hat hackers demonstrated exploits on Samsung Galaxy S8, iPhone 7 and Huawei Mate 9 Pro at Mobile Pwn2Own 2017 and earned $350,000 [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Mobile Security

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Adam Ely's picture
We can attempt to predict the future, but without proper security measures in place, data breaches are bound to happen. Unfortunately, it’s not a matter of if a breach will occur, but when.
Adam Ely's picture
When determining how risky an app is, we must consider intentional features within these permissions to determine whether or not they’re a risk to the enterprise.
Adam Ely's picture
At the end of the day, the kill switch will not only decrease the amount of people mugged for their phones because there is little net value in the device itself, but it will also provide individuals with the means to wipe the device of personal information.
Adam Ely's picture
COPE is often an attractive model for organizations concerned about keeping mobile data secure but presents its own set of issues. So how does COPE stack up against BYOD?
Adam Ely's picture
This shift to mobile exposes a major fault that needs to be addressed and security practices must address mobile threats as well.
Adam Ely's picture
Yesterday’s device management approach does not work in a BYOD world. The end users are bringing their own devices, so we need to adjust to accommodate this new world order.
Adam Ely's picture
Security teams and lines of business have reached a turning point on BYOD. It’s now become more important than ever for the CISO to figure out how to manage risk without inhibiting users.
Adam Ely's picture
Many of us create our own blind spots through assumption. Until we understand what is occurring on mobile devices, we cannot determine if our controls are effective at managing risk.
Adam Ely's picture
CISOs are notoriously disliked. Trying to protect company, customer and employee data often means having to say “no” to new projects and implementations. This does not earn you many friends.
Ryan Naraine's picture
John Hultquist, Manager of Cyber Espionage Threat Intelligence at ISIGHT Partners, joins the podcast to talk about "NEWSCASTER," a cyber espionage operation that uses fictitious social media accounts to launch attacks.