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Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Security researchers have discovered that a piece of malware designed to run on Linux computers has been ported by its creators to Windows.
The complete source code for the Android remote access Trojan (RAT) called Dendroid has been leaked online and, after analyzing it, researchers determined that the malware is plagued by several vulnerabilities.
Hospitals have been hit with a surge in cyber-attacks in recent months, according to Websense.
Users at the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been targeted by malicious actors on several occasions over the past three years.
A new piece of ransomware analyzed by researchers from iSIGHT Partners uses visual components borrowed from CryptoLocker and CryptoWall.
Roman Valerevich Seleznev, a Russian national accused of operating several carding forums and hacking into point of sale systems, has been denied bail, the Department of Justice announced on Friday.
At DEF CON, Zoltan Balazs demonstrated that while multi-layered approaches to security make life difficult for hackers, there is a difference between difficult and impossible.
Researchers have uncovered a new variant of the Bugat banking Trojan which uses HTML injection techniques that are very similar to the ones used by Gameover Zeus.
Supervalu and Albertsons are notifying customers that information associated with their payment cards might have been stolen after hackers broke into systems that processes credit and debit card transactions.
Ukrainian hackers hostile to the government claimed to have launched a cyber attack against the websites of Poland's presidency and the Warsaw Stock Exchange.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Marc Solomon's picture
Malvertising underscores the need for an approach to security that addresses the full attack continuum. With ongoing visibility and control, and intelligent and continuous updates, security professionals can take action to stop the inevitable outbreak.
James McFarlin's picture
One can only hope our nation’s alarm clocks wake up and stir our national leaders’ imaginations before a cyber incident of the magnitude of 9/11 results in the need for a “Cyber Strikes Commission Report.”
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Cybercrime “case studies” are always impersonal, right? Would you get more out of specific stories of individuals caught in the cross hairs instead of corporate entities?
Wade Williamson's picture
The most important aspect for us as security professionals is to realize that the man-in-the-browser is not going away, and to understand what exactly has made it so successful.
Mark Hatton's picture
So what does the World Cup have to do with cyber security? A great deal actually. Anytime there is a large-scale global event, there is a sharp spike in the number of cyber scams that are unleashed.
Tal Be'ery's picture
Defenders should use their "Strategic Depth" to mitigate attacks not on the perimeter but deeper within their network where they can leverage on their strategic advantage.
Wade Williamson's picture
In the same way we have watched APT techniques trickle down from nation-state actors to more opportunistic criminals, we should expect MitB to expand from financial services to all types of applications.
Jeffrey Carr's picture
The term “Tipping Point” is controversial because it has been so widely misused and loosely applied; two abuses that I often see in the cyber security marketplace.
Michael Callahan's picture
While attackers are constantly improving their evasion tactics to extend the lifetime of their malware, users can also leverage these types of evasion tactics to help prevent malware infection in the first place.
Marc Solomon's picture
Many continue to click on links or attachments sent via email without taking any steps to verify the origin of the email or the validity of the link or attachment. It only takes one click to for an attacker to establish a foothold in the target’s systems.