Security Experts:

Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

NSA chief Admiral Michael Rogers said intelligence services need access to encrypted devices to thwart terrorism, and hopes to find common ground with the tech sector on the issue.
A new piece of Android malware can perform a wide range of actions on infected phones without being detected by making it look like the device is turned off.
Researchers have obtained samples of what appears to be Babar, a nation state espionage malware believed to have been developed and used by a French intelligence agency.
Pindrop Security, a startup focused on combating phone-based fraud, announced that it has raised $35 million in a Series B round of financing.
A new report from Verisign reveals that DDoS-for-hire services can be sold for as little as $2 an hour.
The NSA and its British counterpart GCHQ obtained encryption keys of the global SIM manufacturer Gemalto.
Google opposes proposed changes to search warrant issuance rules that would make it easier for the US government to remotely hack into computers
Check Point Software Technologies has acquired Hyperwise, a privately held, security startup focused on CPU-level threat prevention technology.
A piece of malware installed on the systems of Seattle-based casual gaming company Big Fish Games has been used to steal customer payment information.
Researchers at Kaspersky have conducted a detailed analysis of some of the plugins used by the advanced persistent threat (APT) group known as BlackEnergy2 (BE2), or Sandworm Team.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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James McFarlin's picture
Does a dangerous threat lie with ISIS’s possible use of cyber weapons against American critical infrastructure, financial system or other targets? Will such attacks be attempted and do the capabilities exist within ISIS to do so?
James McFarlin's picture
Creative disruption, where a paradigm shift in thinking replaces an existing order, may be an elusive concept but its power as a driving force of human behavior cannot be denied.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Marc Solomon's picture
Malvertising underscores the need for an approach to security that addresses the full attack continuum. With ongoing visibility and control, and intelligent and continuous updates, security professionals can take action to stop the inevitable outbreak.
James McFarlin's picture
One can only hope our nation’s alarm clocks wake up and stir our national leaders’ imaginations before a cyber incident of the magnitude of 9/11 results in the need for a “Cyber Strikes Commission Report.”
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Cybercrime “case studies” are always impersonal, right? Would you get more out of specific stories of individuals caught in the cross hairs instead of corporate entities?
Wade Williamson's picture
The most important aspect for us as security professionals is to realize that the man-in-the-browser is not going away, and to understand what exactly has made it so successful.
Mark Hatton's picture
So what does the World Cup have to do with cyber security? A great deal actually. Anytime there is a large-scale global event, there is a sharp spike in the number of cyber scams that are unleashed.
Tal Be'ery's picture
Defenders should use their "Strategic Depth" to mitigate attacks not on the perimeter but deeper within their network where they can leverage on their strategic advantage.
Wade Williamson's picture
In the same way we have watched APT techniques trickle down from nation-state actors to more opportunistic criminals, we should expect MitB to expand from financial services to all types of applications.