Security Experts:

Cybercrime
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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

A member of the hacker group that breached Yahoo in 2012 has been sentenced to 2 years in prison in the UK [Read More]
Spam email volumes have increased significantly this year, being comparable to the record levels observed in 2010, mainly because of the increased activity of the Necurs botnet, Cisco Talos researchers believe. [Read More]
Hacker Ardit Ferizi, who helped the Islamic State group by providing stolen personal data on more than 1,000 US government and military workers was sentenced to 20 years in prison. [Read More]
File types used by attackers to deliver ransomware include JavaScript, VBScript, and Office files with macros, all coded in ways meant to evade detection from traditional security solutions. [Read More]
Kaspersky details biometric skimmers and other methods that can be used by cybercrooks in ATM attacks [Read More]
The ultimate goal for many of IoT-focused malware is to build strong botnets in order to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, Symantec researchers warn. [Read More]
Mobile malware from the Xiny family of Android Trojans are capable of infecting the processes of system applications and of downloading malicious plug-ins into the infected programs. [Read More]
EFF publishes report to warn police and courts that IP addresses should not be considered a reliable indicator of identity or location [Read More]
The people who launched a 665 Gbps DDoS attack against Brian Krebs appear to have targeted hosting provider OVH in attacks totaling 1 Tbps [Read More]
The actor behind the Ursnif banking Trojan has been using new evasive macros in their latest infection campaign, demonstrating continuous evolution of tools and techniques. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Cybercrime

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Wade Williamson's picture
Behavioral detection models can focus in on what the attacker actually does, instead of relying on a set of signatures or known indicators of compromise that often lag behind attackers.
Ryan Naraine's picture
Thomas Rid, Professor in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London, joins the podcast to discuss the lack of nuance in the crypto debate and the future of global cyber conflict.
Jack Danahy's picture
Typical lockdown or encryption of a system happens within a minute or two of the ransomware’s execution. At that point, there are only two choices left: pay or start cleaning up.
Torsten George's picture
What do enterprises need to know about ransomware attacks and what can they do to minimize the risk of being victimized?
Johnnie Konstantas's picture
While most of us aren’t asking for it, chances are high that we, too, have been—or will become—victims of a cyber attack.
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
It is critical for business leadership to address the growing threat of ransomware as a business risk rather than a siloed IT issue.
Bill Sweeney's picture
The concept of cyber Unicorns is that financial crime achieved via cyber means is no longer a pastime; rather it’s a full time job.
Wade Williamson's picture
The evolution of ransomware from simple malware to more persistent attacks has a major impact on the way enterprise security teams have to think about mitigation.
Scott Gainey's picture
By monitoring for and detecting the underlying and shared behaviors of malware we can effectively stop ransomware infections before they can cause damage.
Shlomo Kramer's picture
Mid-market enterprises with limited resources and weak defenses are a particularly good target for ransomware attacks: they have just enough assets worth paying for, and the capital to do so.