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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The FBI suspects the computer hacking theft of $81 million from Bangladesh's central bank was in part an inside job. [Read More]
Blame for the February cyber theft of $81 million dollars from the Bangladesh central bank New York reserves in February has been levelled at SWIFT technicians by the investigating Bangladeshi police, which SWIFT rejects. [Read More]
Gery Shalon and Ziv Orenstein were arrested in Israel last July and will be extradited following a US request, the justice ministry said. [Read More]
Twitter has barred US intelligence agencies from accessing a service that sorts through posts on the social media platform in real time and has proved useful in the fight against terrorism. [Read More]
Police have arrested 44 people in Britain and Spain suspected of involvement in a scam to hack into accounts belonging to company executives. [Read More]
Nikita Kuzmin, the creator of the Gozi malware, has been sentenced to time served and ordered to pay $7 million [Read More]
The FBI said it would not disclose details of its hack of an iPhone used by one of the shooters in last year's San Bernardino killing spree. [Read More]
Germany is replacing the head of its foreign intelligence service, which has been rocked by revelations it helped the US National Security Agency spy on European targets. [Read More]
FBI Director James Comey said encryption and privacy are important but "there has never been a time in the 240 years of our country when privacy has been absolute." [Read More]
Philippine officials said they have arrested a suspect in the hacking of the national election agency's website ahead of next month's presidential polls. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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Wade Williamson's picture
Asking for security backdoors that only benefit the good guys is like asking for bullets that only hurt the bad guys. That’s simply not how encryption works.
David Holmes's picture
In the initial hours after the Paris attacks by Islamic terrorists, when the PlayStation 4 rumor was first circulating, I decided to see exactly what kind of encryption the PS4 uses for its messaging system.
James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.