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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Edward Snowden says dishonest comments to Congress by the US intelligence chief were the final straw that prompted him to flee the country and reveal a trove of national security documents.
Operation Epic Turla targeted intelligence agencies, government institutions, embassies, military groups, education institutions, and research and pharmaceutical companies in more than 45 countries, the security firm said on Thursday.
Edward Snowden has been granted a three-year residence permit in Russia, his Russian lawyer said at a press conference Thursday.
Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott defended tough new terror laws under which digital data will be retained for up to two years, denying it is an invasion of privacy.
The latest media scoop about the internal workings of the US intelligence community has convinced officials they have a new leaker feeding information to journalists.
Chinese authorities are investigating two Canadians for alleged espionage, state media reported Tuesday, a week after Canada accused Beijing of "state-sponsored" hacking.
Israel eavesdropped on US Secretary of State John Kerry during doomed peace talks with the Palestinians last year, according to reports.
Edward Snowden marked on Thursday one year of political asylum in Russia, where he continues to live a life shrouded in mystery amid a dearth of public appearances.
The head of the CIA has apologized to US lawmakers after an investigation confirmed claims that his officers had "improperly" accessed Senate computers.
Microsoft will challenge a US court order requiring it to give prosecutors electronic mail content associated with an overseas server in a data center in Dublin.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.
John Vecchi's picture
Understanding the various types of malicious actors targeting your networks, including their motivations and modus operandi, is key to identifying, expelling and expunging them.
Gant Redmon's picture
When it comes to cybercrime, the police really can’t and aren’t going to protect residents of your town. The same goes for all towns and cities. Unless you’re talking a high six-figure theft, it's unlikely an officer will be assigned to your case.
Rod Rasmussen's picture
In this second column in a two part series, Rod tackles the impact of the DNSChanger malware and simple solutions to counter similar DNS attacks on enterprises and major government agencies.