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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The US National Security Agency developed plans to hack into data links to app stores operated by Google and Samsung to plant spyware on smartphones, a media report said.
Germany's BND intelligence agency helped the CIA track down Osama bin Laden in Pakistan where US special forces killed the al-Qaeda leader, according to a report published Sunday.
The US House of Representatives voted Wednesday to end the NSA's dragnet collection of telephone data from millions of Americans, a controversial program revealed in 2013 by former security contractor Edward Snowden.
The APT28 cyber espionage group allegedly sponsored by Russia is planning to attack several banks, according to a report by root9B.
The US intelligence agency NSA asked its German partner service BND to spy on Siemens, a newspaper reported, noting that that Siemens was suspected of supplying communications technology to a Russian secret service.
Two individuals have been indicted and arrested for hacking Photobucket accounts. They developed a tool called Photofucket to access private images and videos.
The United States expressed concern Friday over reports China has used a powerful censorship tool dubbed "Great Cannon" to attack websites around the world.
Many US lawmakers and an array of interest groups want to rein in the government's surveillance programs, aware of public backlash that began with bombshell leaks two years ago.
A widening scandal over claims Germany helped the US spy on European targets triggered tensions in Angela Merkel's coalition Tuesday, which analysts said could potentially prove dangerous for the "untouchable" chancellor.
The German intelligence service BND, which is accused of helping the United States spy on EU leaders and companies, had actually "deleted 12,000 requests" targeting European officials, according to Saturday's edition of the Der Spiegel weekly.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

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James McFarlin's picture
The overall industry tone of caution around active defenses may be calibrated to defuse the notion rather than taking the argument, buying time for other alternatives to surface.
David Holmes's picture
In 2011, Twitter began encrypting all information between the (mostly) mobile endpoints and their own servers. This made it more difficult for monitoring agencies to determine a mobile user’s Twitter profile, and thereby that user’s follow list. More difficult, but not impossible.
Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.