Security Experts:

long dotted

NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

The FBI vowed to widen a probe into the massive hacking of naked celebrity photos if necessary, after new reported leaks including nude shots of Kim Kardashian.
Apple is rolling out new privacy protections for iPhones and iPads, with a new system that makes it impossible for the company to unlock a device even with a warrant.
A media rights group urged Qatar to revoke sections of a new cybercrime law, saying they threaten freedom of expression in the Gulf state.
Nigeria's anti-graft agency said it was hunting a 38-year-old bank worker for allegedly stealing $38 million from his employers by hacking into computer systems.
The NSA and British intelligence services are able to secretly access data from telecoms giant Deutsche Telekom and several other German operators, according to Der Spiegel weekly.
Dropbox released another transparency report on Thursday and announced that moving forward, it will do so every six months in an effort to keep the public informed of its interactions with authorities.
US authorities threatened to fine Yahoo $250,000 a day if it failed to comply with a secret surveillance program.
U.S. law enforcement authorities claim to have leveraged a leaky CAPTCHA on the login page of Silk Road to identify the real IP address of the server hosting the website.
Security industry experts have analyzed the attack of iCloud user accounts and commented on the impact of the incident on Apple's reputation, and provided recommendations on how to avoid such leaks in the future.
Those behind the massive leak of naked celebrity photos that shocked the show business world could and should be prosecuted, including for child sex crimes, experts said.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Tracking & Law Enforcement

rss icon

Adam Firestone's picture
The time has come for the technology professions to demonstrate ethical maturity and adopt standards of ethical conduct to which we hold ourselves and our peers accountable.
Wade Williamson's picture
If criminals can’t use or sell stolen data without being caught, then the data quickly becomes worthless. As a result it’s critical to understand what happens to data after a breach.
Eric Knapp's picture
Because transactions using virtual currencies happen anonymously, they confuse issues of jurisdiction and can become difficult to enforce. When authorities do take action, cybercrime simply re-images itself with a new currency and a new platform.
Oliver Rochford's picture
As the “Snowden leaks” continue in their revelations and unraveling of the twisted web of government surveillance, it is becoming clear that the foundation of trust in the Internet as a shared commons has been thoroughly undermined.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
The power of metadata does not come in that data itself but in the ability of that data to be processed and correlated in an automated fashion. What many believe is meaningless data can reveal more than one would think.
Chris Coleman's picture
Over the past year the buzz around tracking threat actors has been growing and in my opinion hitting the height of the hype cycle. Relying on behavior profiles alone is a great way to get an unwelcomed outcome.
Eric Knapp's picture
The NSA tapping into our digital lives is a heinous breach of privacy, say those on the opposing team. I say, “meh.” Assume that everything you do and say is being watched and heard, always.
Mark Hatton's picture
They always say in the investment world that cash is king. We are now seeing that in terms of cyber as well. Stealing cash, it’s even better than stealing money.
John Vecchi's picture
Understanding the various types of malicious actors targeting your networks, including their motivations and modus operandi, is key to identifying, expelling and expunging them.
Gant Redmon's picture
When it comes to cybercrime, the police really can’t and aren’t going to protect residents of your town. The same goes for all towns and cities. Unless you’re talking a high six-figure theft, it's unlikely an officer will be assigned to your case.