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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Researchers have uncovered a new variant of the Bugat banking Trojan which uses HTML injection techniques that are very similar to the ones used by Gameover Zeus.
Krysanec, a remote access Trojan (RAT) for Android, is capable of infiltrating both free and paid Android apps, and it has been distributed via a file sharing website.
According to Damballa, there is no correlation between the size of an organization and the proportion of machines infected with malware.
Cyber-attackers backed by China conducted “a series of apparently targeted, sophisticated cyber-attacks” against activists representing the Uyghurs, a group of researchers have found.
The use of virtualized systems in a enterprise environments can provide many benefits, but these systems need some special attention paid to security, Symantec said in a new report examining threats to virtual environments.
The Chicago Yacht Club has determined that a piece of malware was installed on one of its point-of-sale (PoS) servers between April 26 and June 21.
Director of Kaspersky Lab Global Research & Analysis Team Costin Raiu joins the podcast to discuss the latests discoveries surrounding the Epic Turla cyber-espionage campaign.
Two new two new Gameover Zeus variants generate roughly 1,000 domains per day and 10,000 domains per day.
FireEye and Fox-IT have teamed up to provide a new service to assist users whose computers have been infected with the notorious CryptoLocker ransomware.
Vectra Networks, a provider of real-time detection of cyber attacks in progress, has received $25 Million in an oversubscribed Series C financing round led by VC firm Accel Partners.

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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Marc Solomon's picture
Malvertising underscores the need for an approach to security that addresses the full attack continuum. With ongoing visibility and control, and intelligent and continuous updates, security professionals can take action to stop the inevitable outbreak.
Wade Williamson's picture
The most important aspect for us as security professionals is to realize that the man-in-the-browser is not going away, and to understand what exactly has made it so successful.
Wade Williamson's picture
In the same way we have watched APT techniques trickle down from nation-state actors to more opportunistic criminals, we should expect MitB to expand from financial services to all types of applications.
Michael Callahan's picture
While attackers are constantly improving their evasion tactics to extend the lifetime of their malware, users can also leverage these types of evasion tactics to help prevent malware infection in the first place.
Marc Solomon's picture
Many continue to click on links or attachments sent via email without taking any steps to verify the origin of the email or the validity of the link or attachment. It only takes one click to for an attacker to establish a foothold in the target’s systems.
Danelle Au's picture
Trying to defend against modern, advanced attacks with one-off point solutions is like playing a whack-a-mole game, always one step behind the attacker and trying to play catch up with the alerts as they’re received.
Marc Solomon's picture
Mosquitoes are quite similar to malware. There are thousands of species and numerous ways to try to protect against them but each method has its limitations.
Aviv Raff's picture
Without the elements of prevention, detection, and protection all working together, threat actors will always have the advantage, and will find a way to carry out their illicit economic, political or social agendas.
Aviv Raff's picture
A combination of new threat actors, new attack approaches, and new masking tactics demand that enterprises redefine malware, and make all necessary investments in people, technology and systems to stay one step ahead.
Mark Hatton's picture
One of my concerns heading into these Olympic Games is that the public has become somewhat desensitized to cyber-attacks and we may not have the same level of vigilance against cyber threats as we should.