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NEWS & INDUSTRY UPDATES

Researchers believe Iran used the Triton/Trisis ICS malware to attack a critical infrastructure organization in Saudi Arabia [Read More]
A new piece of malware designed to target ICS, named "Triton", has been used in an attack on a critical infrastructure organization and the goal may have been to cause physical damage [Read More]
In an effort to boost the fight against malicious software, anti-malware company Avast this week announced the release of its retargetable machine-code decompiler as open source. [Read More]
Spider ransomware uses decoy documents auto-synced to enterprise cloud storage and collaborations apps. [Read More]
macOS-targeting HiddenLotus backdoor is using an innovative technique to disguise the fact that it is an executable in order to avoid alerting users on its execution. [Read More]
In an attempt to benefit from the recent spike in the value of Bitcoin, the authors of a remote access Trojan have started targeting Bitcoin investors with their malicious software. [Read More]
Organizations are getting better at detecting breaches, but attackers are also working on improving their tactics and techniques [Read More]
Iranian cyber espionage group tracked as OilRig and APT34 has been exploiting the recently patched Equation Editor vulnerability in Office to deliver malware [Read More]
Two newly discovered .NET-based ransomware families are using open source repositories to encrypt users’ files, Zscaler security researchers say. [Read More]
UBoatRAT is a newly discovered custom remote access Trojan (RAT) used in attacks on personnel or organizations related to South Korea and the video gaming industry, Palo Alto Networks reveal. [Read More]

FEATURES, INSIGHTS // Malware

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Wade Williamson's picture
Behavioral detection models can focus in on what the attacker actually does, instead of relying on a set of signatures or known indicators of compromise that often lag behind attackers.
Jack Danahy's picture
Typical lockdown or encryption of a system happens within a minute or two of the ransomware’s execution. At that point, there are only two choices left: pay or start cleaning up.
Torsten George's picture
What do enterprises need to know about ransomware attacks and what can they do to minimize the risk of being victimized?
Jennifer Blatnik's picture
It is critical for business leadership to address the growing threat of ransomware as a business risk rather than a siloed IT issue.
Wade Williamson's picture
The evolution of ransomware from simple malware to more persistent attacks has a major impact on the way enterprise security teams have to think about mitigation.
Scott Gainey's picture
By monitoring for and detecting the underlying and shared behaviors of malware we can effectively stop ransomware infections before they can cause damage.
Shlomo Kramer's picture
Mid-market enterprises with limited resources and weak defenses are a particularly good target for ransomware attacks: they have just enough assets worth paying for, and the capital to do so.
Scott Gainey's picture
Companies need educate employees about ransomware, and the techniques criminals use to launch attacks such as phishing emails or distribution through social media channels.
Scott Gainey's picture
To replace antivirus, consider alternatives that integrate prediction, prevention, detection and remediation to protect against advanced threats that employ a wide variety of attack vectors.
Simon Crosby's picture
We owe the richness of today’s Web to the micro-payment model of online advertising, and it is difficult to imagine an alternative. But there are consequences for anyone who uses the Internet, although they may not realize it.