Security Experts:

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Cerber ransomware now has the ability to kill many database processes with the use of a close_process directive in the configuration file. [Read More]
The actor behind WildFire, a piece of ransomware that emerged earlier this year, has decided to rebrand the malware after security researchers created a decryption tool for it. [Read More]
The recently discovered MarsJoke ransomware has a encryption weakness that has allowed Kaspersky Lab security researchers to create a decryptor and help users restore their files for free. [Read More]
The RIG exploit kit (EK) might be moving up the social ladder to become the top threat in its segment and leave Neutrino behind, recently observed malvertising campaigns suggest. [Read More]
The Locky ransomware has adopted a new ".ODIN" extension appended to encrypted files, and gone back to using command and control (C&C) servers. [Read More]
State and local government agencies, as well as K-12 educational institutions are being targeted in a newly discovered ransomware variant called MarsJoke. [Read More]
Android malware is becoming more resilient courtesy of newly adopted techniques that also allow malicious programs to avoid detection, Symantec reveals. [Read More]
File types used by attackers to deliver ransomware include JavaScript, VBScript, and Office files with macros, all coded in ways meant to evade detection from traditional security solutions. [Read More]
The ultimate goal for many of IoT-focused malware is to build strong botnets in order to launch distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks, Symantec researchers warn. [Read More]
Mobile malware from the Xiny family of Android Trojans are capable of infecting the processes of system applications and of downloading malicious plug-ins into the infected programs. [Read More]


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Scott Gainey's picture
By monitoring for and detecting the underlying and shared behaviors of malware we can effectively stop ransomware infections before they can cause damage.
Shlomo Kramer's picture
Mid-market enterprises with limited resources and weak defenses are a particularly good target for ransomware attacks: they have just enough assets worth paying for, and the capital to do so.
Scott Gainey's picture
Companies need educate employees about ransomware, and the techniques criminals use to launch attacks such as phishing emails or distribution through social media channels.
Scott Gainey's picture
To replace antivirus, consider alternatives that integrate prediction, prevention, detection and remediation to protect against advanced threats that employ a wide variety of attack vectors.
Simon Crosby's picture
We owe the richness of today’s Web to the micro-payment model of online advertising, and it is difficult to imagine an alternative. But there are consequences for anyone who uses the Internet, although they may not realize it.
Bill Sweeney's picture
While the battlefield and rules of engagement have changed, the people fighting the battle against APTs remain as committed as ever.
Wade Williamson's picture
Although ransomware is commonly targeted at consumers, recent versions have targeted the enterprise with a vengeance. This has shifted ransomware from a nuisance to a potentially debilitating attack that can freeze critical assets and intellectual property.
Simon Crosby's picture
While data breaches aren’t going away anytime soon, every company has a choice of how they prepare for them. By focusing on the endpoint, businesses can better secure themselves with less cost and less time expended by the IT team.
Marc Solomon's picture
Given the continuous innovation by attackers, it’s likely that your malware analysis needs have exceeded the capabilities of traditional sandboxing technologies.
Wade Williamson's picture
By building security controls that identify and correlate the malicious behaviors of an attack, we can begin to the tip the scales back in our favor.