Security Experts:

More Security Headlines

Google has released a new version of End-to-End, an open source encryption extension for Chrome introduced by the company earlier this year.
The developers of the popular PHP-based open source Internet forum software phpBB have shut down their network following a cyberattack in which user information might have been compromised.
Several Linux distributions are affected by a couple of security holes found in "mailx," a utility that's used for sending and receiving mail.
Hackers invoked the 9/11 attacks Tuesday in their most chilling threat yet against Sony Pictures.
According to Symantec, researchers have seen a spike in emails with malicious links of late.
The PCI Security Standards Council is weighing in to help push best practices for terminal software security.
Web browsers should inform users when they are accessing a website over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) to make them aware of the fact that there is no data security, the Chrome Security Team said in a proposal published over the weekend.
A new financial malware designed to target the customers of South Korean banks has been spotted in the wild by researchers at Trend Micro
CA Technologies, one of the world's largest independent software corporations, has released a hotfix to address several vulnerabilities affecting the company's CA Release Automation product.
Microsoft said it had secured broad support from a coalition of influential technology and media firms as it seeks to challenge a US ruling ordering it to hand over emails stored on a server in Ireland.

SecurityWeek Experts

rss icon

Pat Calhoun's picture
A faster, poorly secured network can actually accelerate the spread of APTs, while building protection against threats can slow down networks.
David Holmes's picture
Since its inception, SSL has been plagued by “man-in-the-middle” attacks, and in the past the twenty years, only slight progress has been made toward properly defending against it.
Joshua Goldfarb's picture
Is budget a good metric for security? In other words, if an organization wishes to improve its security posture, is spending more money an appropriate response?
Torsten George's picture
For all the benefits that social media networks provide, organizations must recognize that they present a double-edged sword when it comes to security.
Jon-Louis Heimerl's picture
Credit card security really is easier than it sounds. Some of this stuff is easy once you are set up.
Tal Be'ery's picture
Passwords needs to be strong enough to resist a guessing attack, often named a "Brute-force" attack. The brute-force attack comes in two flavors: online and offline.
David Maman's picture
Moving sensitive data into the hands of third-party cloud providers expands and complicates the risk landscape in which companies operate every day.
Pat Calhoun's picture
A growing number of corporate IT and security personnel have something in common with extreme athletes: they take unnecessary security risks.
Scott Gainey's picture
Panic triggers a response that often leads to potentially catastrophic mistakes. Those mistakes come as we grasp for short-term fixes that give us a stronger sense of control, but don’t take long term consequences into account.
James McFarlin's picture
Was the plan by the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association (SIFMA) to create a new inter-agency working group comprised of data security regulators a reaction to the recent acceleration of nationwide data breaches?